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Opinion: Black Wealth Hardly Exists, Even When You Include NBA, NFL and Rap Stars

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*I don’t care if Odell Beckham Jr. scores another NFL touchdown this year while wearing the rapper Drake’s OVO cleats. I don’t care if Stephen Curry gets along with Kevin Durant this NBA season.
And I really don’t care what Lebron James thinks about Hillary Clinton and the election.  What I do care about deeply is the story, or lack thereof on why there is so little black wealth in America, and the decadent veil being used to disguise its nonexistence.
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#Blackwealthmatters, I have written extensively on the subject on sites from Inequality.org and beyond. Today we stand at a place where African Americans own little if any of America’s land, produce little if any of the country’s resources and possess negligible amounts of this nation’s immense wealth. This is all while they still project aspiration based on a blind faith in the American Dream.

We see the effect of the fallout from Chicago to Baltimore, as the police march into rioting black communities starved of resources. Yet no one is talking about the state of black life as the economic catastrophe which it has become in a substantively consistent way.

We’re not hearing anything from President Barack Obama, not the Congressional Black Caucus, and definitely neither Clinton nor Trump. Not even black families themselves are dealing with the financial realities of these times. It is as if there is a belief all this economic tragedy can exist, and black Americans can still buy homes, pay off student loans and save for retirement, despite all the current data showing otherwise. As an example, the National Association of Real Estate Broker’s 2016 report, “The State of Housing in Black America” recently stated, that the current home ownership rate for blacks is at a twenty year low of 41.7 percent. To give that rate context, it is lower than the national home ownership rate was during the Great Depression of the 1930s.

In fact, when you deduct the family car and other depreciating assets from their worth of the total 14.5 million African American homes, half of all black American households accounting for over 7 million families of three, have a total net worth of less than $1,700. While the net worth of the median white family remains near $100,000 using the same method of accounting. Yet African Americans dream on. Even the white poor have more money than most black families. Princeton University sociologist Dalton Conley has found that even white families living near the poverty line have a net worth exceeding $10,000.

Going even further into the data, a recent study by the Institute for Policy Studies (IPS) and the Corporation For Economic Development (CFED) found that it would take 228 years for the average black family to amass the same level of wealth the average white family holds today in 2016. All while white families create even more wealth over those same two hundred years. In fact, this is a gap that will never close if America stays on its current economic path. According to the Institute on Assets and Social Policy, for each dollar of increase in average income an African American household saw from 1984 – 2009 just $0.69 in additional wealth was generated, compared with the same dollar in increased income creating an additional $5.19 in wealth for a similarly situated white household.

Earlier this year I had the opportunity to have an in depth discussion with African American media mogul Byron Allen, which can be heard on my YouTube channel. Allen, who after recent dealings is reportedly worth in excess of a billion dollars, characterized the current situation facing black families quite simply as “economic genocide”. In an attempt to create some change, he has brought lawsuits against major cable companies, Charter and Comcast for what he frames as the telecommunications giants plainly avoiding doing business with fully black owned media companies. Allen explained

“The matrix which is hey, as African Americans, primarily we do not have access to a real education. You do not have access to jobs. You do not have access to opportunity. We do not have access to capital that is not predatory. So what does that leave you? It leaves you with… economic genocide.”

I agree, and believe a large part of the reason we can’t get honest is a decadent veil of black celebrity has been used to mask the massive amount of black poverty. African Americans have increasingly come to base their view of the current economic state of black America on the reflections of Jay Z’s purchase of Tidal for 56 million dollars, rather than the millions of black American families that as a whole lost by some reports half of their wealth over the last several years. For a generation of blacks, celebrity exceptionalism and its results has been confused with the economic progress, or the lack thereof that has been achieved by the black race as a whole since the days of the Civil Rights Movement. This approach has come to create an escape for far too many, one where vision boards on bedroom walls filled with quotes of overcoming odds from wealthy African American celebrities, proves more important than their very own real economic struggles of the moment.

In addition, a middle white America overexposed to a few million-dollar NBA stars, has become apathetic to the normal plight of black Americans as a result. We must remember the empathy of the white middle class was among Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s greatest tools in the fight for equality and civil rights. Now apathy has set in as white Americans say, well you have rich people too black America. All this being believed while failing to deal with the data, which shows a different story altogether. A set of numbers that show these African American celebrities are of such small numbers, and limited level of real wealth, they shouldn’t frame anyone’s idea of a population of over 40 million black people. Thomas Piketty in his acclaimed book “Capital in the Twenty First Century” stated

Recent research, based on matching declared income on tax returns with corporate compensation records, allows me to state that the vast majority (60 to 70 percent, depending on what definitions one chooses) of the top 0.1 percent of the income hierarchy in 2000-2010 consists of top managers. By comparison, athletes, actors, and artists of all kinds make up less than 5 percent of this group. In this sense, the new US inequality has much more to do with the advent of “supermanagers” than with that of “superstars.”

Bloomberg recently gave a racial framework to the information above by reporting that only 1% of the S&P 500 CEOs are black, with African Americans making up a mere 2.6% of those holding posts within striking distance of becoming next to head one of these major companies. White males and white females collectively hold nearly 90% of these top spots, which, according to Piketty are the type of supermanager positions that are making most of the money in America.

Just last week Forbes released its annual Forbes 400 report on the richest people in the U.S., focusing in on the top 25 people on The 2016 Forbes 400, they are all white, and have a combined net worth of over 900 billion dollars. That is over 37% of the total 2.4 trillion dollars in wealth held by all 400 members on the elite list. Together, this data makes clear white supermanagers, and white capital holders are making most, if not nearly all of the American held wealth being earned in the U.S. today. Wealth in America is not diverse, in fact, it is really white. This remains true no matter how many times we are shown Lebron James in his mansion in feel good commercials. Because for every singular sports phenom like Lebron James playing basketball, there is not just a Bill Gates controlling computers, there are countless white wealth holders making money that black Americans are locked out of accessing. The great irony being that whites also make up the bulk of the 5% of entertainers in the top .1% of earners Piketty refers to as well.

Looking at this even more specifically, a set of data recently released by the Survey of Consumer Finances and Brandeis Research showed counting all their assets less than 1% of black families have over 1.4 million dollars in net worth. This is contrasted with nearly 10% of white families holding the same amount of wealth.

Black Wealth

Using this data as a guide in raw numbers well over 8 million white homes are millionaires, while less than a few hundred thousand black families can claim the same million-dollar status. In addition, a mere several thousand black families can claim they are within the top 1% of earners.

We now live in a time where the five largest white landowners in America, own more agricultural land than all of black America, with all white families together owning 98% of the land, worth nearly 97 percent of the value. We are in a period where as reported by Demos.org, the top ten percent of white homes own nearly everything, with the next tier of white households holding most of the remaining wealth. In fact, the 2.4 trillion dollars of wealth in the accounts of the few people on The Forbes 400 list is more wealth than that in the possession of all 41 million black Americans combined.

This is the truth about the amount of wealth held by the progeny of American slavery. The summation is that while blacks live in the wealthiest country the world has known, despite the displaying of a few wealthy black celebrities most African Americans have little if any personal wealth to show for it.

Antonio Moore, an attorney based in Los Angeles, is one of the producers of the Emmy-nominated documentary Freeway: Crack in the System. He has contributed pieces to the Grio, Huffington Post, and Inequality.org on the topics of race, mass incarceration and economics. Subscribe to his YouTube channel @Tonetalks

 

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4 Comments

4 Comments

  1. Shelly Stanburn

    October 12, 2016 at 7:44 pm

    Powerful piece yet again. Keep up the work of exposing us to data not emotional aspirational beliefs.

  2. straightnochaser

    October 12, 2016 at 9:59 pm

    Providing the data is one thing. Now, what do WE do with it?

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Is Pres. Elect Biden Obama’s 3rd Term? & What 44 Said About Black America’s Progress Under His Watch on ‘Breakfast Club’ (VIDEO)

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Charlamagne Tha God - Barack Obama
Charlamagne Tha God - Barack Obama

Charlamagne Tha God – Barack Obama

*Attorney Antonio Moore discusses the recent Obama Breakfast Club interview during his Book tour.

Moore harshly critiques the interview of Pres. Obama performed by Charlamagne, DJ Envy and Angela Yee.

He also looks closer at President Elect Joe Biden’s cabinet picks and measures them again Barack Obama & Bill Clinton’s prior administrations.

MORE NEWS: Ripped in Their 50s! Mike Tyson and Roy Jones Strip Down for Weigh-in / WATCH

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** FEATURED STORY **

The Virtual United Negro College Fund Tour Heads to NY, DC & NJ on Fri & Sat-Nov. 20 & 21 (EUR EXCLUSIVE!)

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*African American students interested in going to college can attend the United Negro College Fund’s (UNCF) Fall 2020 virtual Empower Me Tour. Set for this Friday and Saturday (November 20 & 21, 2020), New York, District of Columbia, and New Jersey will be repped. (This year’s tour kicked off earlier this month in Wisconsin and Illinois). To register, go here.

The Empower Me Tour is an extension of the goals of the UNCF. Founded in 1944, the UNCF, a non-profit, has raised more than $5 billion and helped more than 500,000 students attend 37 private historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs).

The EUR caught up with Stacey Lee, the tour’s director for four years, who discussed the importance of the event.

“The UNCF is the nation’s largest provider of education support to minority students,” said Lee. “The Empowerment Tour has been executed for the past 12 years and last year along we offered over $12 million dollars in scholarships.”

MORE NEWS/RELATED: BMEE Authors: Urgent Steps Are Necessary to Address Implicit Bias in Early Education  

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Stacey Lee, director of the Empower Me Tour. (Photo credit: UNCF)

Lee continued, “I think the great thing is that during these times, even with COVID-19, is that a number of corporations (Wells Fargo/P&/FedEx/Disney/Goldman Sachs) and donors have really been providing opportunity and financial access to our schools and students.”

The tour is packed with information and resources so that students and parents have the right tools to make informed decisions.

“It’s a free event that provides educational support, scholarships, interviews with colleges, empowerment, and information on how to get to and through college. We also provide this information for parents as well. We have a parent section that focuses on financial aid and the things you need to get your students to college.”

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Source: Empower Me Tour

Lee continued, “Sometimes we have students that don’t realize that they can attend college. They can receive scholarships. Some of them don’t even know what an HBCU is. So, it’s inspirational for me to see these students receive this information and the excitement that’s around this tour.”

In addition to college information, panel sessions on issues affecting the community will also take place. Legendary rapper Bun B will be part of a special My Black Is Beautiful panel. The panel will have discussions with girls and boys and the MC will lead the male portion.

“It’s about empowerment,” Bun B told the EUR. “It’s vital for us to lift each other up and amplify each other’s voices. We just talk about now what that role is in this COVID world. And with everything that we are seeing with young Black men on television, we want to keep them motivated and centered. We want to make sure that they are not discouraged in this moment.”

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Legendary rapper Bun B is a panelist at the Empower Me Tour. (Photo credit: UNCF)

Ever since Kamala Harris threw her hat into the presidential race and elected vice president of the United States, a spotlight has shined on the fact that she’s an HBCU grad (Howard University) and member of the African American sorority Alpha Kappa Alpha. These facts are not lost on the UNCF.

“Kamala has really boosted people’s awareness about HBCUs and (African American sororities) and the type of people that come out of HBCUs. HBCUS have also provided so many people from science, mathematics, and engineering programs (STEM).”

Bun B added, “We have more than enough examples to show you how beneficial an education from an HBCU can be. So, there is no reason to not be a part of an HBCU because the world is just as available to you as it is for anyone else attending any other type of university.”

Register for the virtual Empower Me Tour on November 20 & 21, 2020 here. Spring tour dates will be announced soon. For general information on the United Negro College Fund, go here.

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(Photo credit: UNCF)

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New Music Buzz: Jazzy Rita Shelby’s ‘Goodbye 2020’

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Goodbye 2020 Jazzy Rita Shelby
Goodbye 2020 Jazzy Rita Shelby

After all that’s happened this year, it’s time to say Goodbye 2020. New single available by Jazzy Rita Shelby at most digital platforms.

*SB Music presents “Goodbye 2020” a new single for the times we are in.

“Goodbye 2020” is performed by Jazzy Rita Shelby and written by Miss Shelby (ASCAP) and Eddie Lawrence Miller (BMI).

It’s the perfect anthem to end a year that has impacted the globe.

Jazzy Rita Shelby Goodbye 2020 looking up - Copy

Jazzy Rita Shelby is fed up with this year and elated about her new single “Goodbye 2020.” Avail now from SB Music (Written by L. Shelby & E. Miller)

EURweb’s Jazzy Rita is also a prolific lyricist who has teamed up with Eddie Miller for “Goodbye 2020” because it was timely and convenient for the birth of a song such as this.

Eddie Miller is a coveted keyboardist & vocalist who performs regularly with Brian Culbertson and he’s the Rhodes Festival musical director. Jazzy Rita rose to notoriety as host & performer at The Starlight Jazz Serenade, an annual benefit concert in North Hollywood with an A list of stars.  As a teen Miss Shelby was inspired to write songs by the legendary David Porter.

This year has been a year like no other.  “Goodbye 2020” is an ode to the world for the year that we have seen and the hope that lies ahead.  Radio Programmers click here for adds.

MORE NEWS: THE REAL: The Ladies’ Experience With Stereotypes in Hollywood. Plus, Cheryl Hines Is Here!

“Goodbye 2020” is released on the SB Music label and was recorded at Wishing Wells Studio in Canoga Park, CA.  Willie Daniels and Mildred Black perform background vocals along with Jazzy Rita.  The video is produced & directed by Jazzy Rita (LaRita Shelby), filmed & edited by Reggie Simon of Simon Vision Media, with wardrobe styling by Jazzy Rita and Poet Roni Girl’s Army Couture.  “Goodbye 2020” is available on most digital platforms.  Click here to listen on Spotify.

https://www.facebook.com/LaRitaShelbyfans
https://twitter.com/JazzyRitaShelby
https://www.instagram.com/jazzyritashelby

 

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