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India Goes Wild for Kamala’s Family Roots / VIDEO

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Indian Roots: Kamala Harris, back row, left. From left: her grandmother Rajam Gopalan, grandfather P.V. Gopalan and sister, Maya Harris. Front row: Maya’s daughter, Meena, left, and Harris’ cousin Sharada Balachandran Orihuela. (Family photo)

*Residents in Sen. Kamala Harris’ ancestral village haven’t seen her in years, but they are praying for her victory by sacrificing coconuts in Hindu temples. Others are pasting up posters or cheering the vice-presidential hopeful on social media.

In Tamil Naidu, she would win overwhelmingly among her landsmen.

Residents see her as America’s first Indian-American nominated for national office, not so much as the first African-American or the latest woman to be nominated for the vice presidency.

 

“In India, people who put up posters for Harris are breaking coconuts in temples,” said Harris’s uncle, Balachandran Gopalan. A New Delhi-based academic, Gopalan explained that breaking coconuts is a form of ritualistic worship for Hindus, especially those from south India. “I have also done the same,” he added. When his niece was sworn in to the U.S. Senate in 2017 by Joe Biden, he attended the ceremony.

Colorful posters wishing Harris victory are on display throughout her grandfather’s ancestral village, Painganadu Thusalendrapuram, in the Indian state of Tamil Nadu.

The poster went viral after Harris’s niece, Meena Harris, posted it on Twitter. “This is from Tamil Nadu, where our Indian family is from,” she wrote. “It says: ‘PV Gopalan’s granddaughter is victorious.’”

Today Harris has few living relatives in her home state besides an aunt, Dr. Sarala Gopalan, who lives in Chennai, the state’s capital. Still, the candidate’s campaign is eager for Harris to be seen as Indian American. In her Democratic National Convention speech, she spoke about her chithis (“aunts” in Tamil). While Americans had to google what it meant, the Tamil-speaking world was elated to hear a word in their mother tongue from the vice presidential nominee.

The villagers Zenger interviewed in Painganadu Thusalendrapuram—including those who were hanging posters—knew of the candidate more from the American news than from any living connection. But for the 2020 elections, the Democratic Party is going all-out to win the Indian vote and is using Kamala Harris’s roots as its calling card.

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Kamala Harris’s ethnicity is Indian and Jamaican. / Getty and Instagram

The Asian Indian population in the U.S. increased from 396,000 in 1980 to over 2.7 million in 2010, according to the website Statista. The group is one of the fastest-growing ethnicities in America, and with high levels of education and financial status, Asian Indians are gaining political clout. In matters of American foreign policy, India has become an important player, both as a venue for American business interests and as a strategic counterweight to China’s strength. As a result, there have been clear attempts to woo Indians’ support from Democrats and Republicans.

During the 2016 general elections, the Hindu American Foundation and the Republican Hindu Coalition threw their weight behind the Trump campaign. In return, Trump repeatedly promised Indians in general and Hindus in particular his support should he become president.

Mimicking Indian prime minister Narendra Modi’s 2014 campaign slogan “Ab ki baar Modi Sarkar” (“This time a Modi government”), a 2016 video of Donald Trump proclaiming Ab ki baar Trump Sarkar went viral with Indians in the U.S. and in India.

Harris—the first Indian-American and African-American woman to run for vice president—has often spoken of how her mother, Shyamala Gopalan Harris, had a strong influence on her.

“Shyamala was an exceptional woman,” said Balachandran Gopalan. “She was a hard taskmaster and pushed her children to give their best. No wonder Kamala keeps talking about the influence her mother had on her life.”

Harris opened her vice-presidential nomination acceptance speech by remembering her mother and regretting that she was not there to see her success. “My mother taught me that service to others gives life purpose and meaning,” she said.

Her mother studied for a master’s in nutrition and endocrinology at University of California—Berkeley starting in 1958. She completed her Ph.D. before venturing into breast cancer research.

“She went to study science in the U.S. at a time when very few American women were studying science, forget unmarried Indian women,” said Gopalan. “My father had no objection to her going for higher studies as long as she could get a scholarship and fund her studies.”

Shyamala Gopalan Harris joined the civil rights movement in Berkeley in the 1960s and met Donald J. Harris, a Jamaican graduate student, at a protest. They married in 1963. After their divorce in the 1970s, Kamala Harris would visit Chennai frequently with her mother and sister.

In a YouTube video with Mindy Kaling late last year, Harris revealed that her grandfather was “mischievous,” making her French toast when his strictly vegetarian wife was out of town. “People have these stereotypes,” said Harris. “My grandfather was very progressive.”

In her bestseller “The Truths We Hold: An American Journey,” the Democratic candidate wrote at length about her family in India and how she was close to them: “They lived many thousands of miles away, and we rarely saw one another. Still, through many long-distance calls, our periodic trips to India, and letters and cards written back and forth, our sense of family—of closeness and comfort and trust—was able to penetrate the distance.”

“Kamala would visit India with her mother very often, almost every year when both my parents were alive,” said Gopalan.

Harris’s grandfather died in 1998; his wife Rajam in 2009. But Gopalan has kept in touch with his niece and has closely followed her political career. Her vice-presidential nomination was no surprise to him. “I have been following the news analyses in the U.S. media and election polls and trends,” he said. “She has a good chance unless Trump comes up with a U.S.-made vaccine for Covid-19 before September or something equally dramatic.”

For Gopalan—like the residents of his ancestral village—his niece has already won.

(Edited by Siddharthya Roy and Anne Denbok.)



The post India Goes Wild for Kamala’s Family Roots appeared first on Zenger News.

Family - Parenting - Births

Man With Down Syndrome Overcome with Emotion After Seeing Tattoo of Himself on Brother’s Arm (Watch)

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Erick (left) reacts to a tattoo of himself on his brother, Rafa’s, arm

*A beautiful expression of brotherly love has gone viral after their mom shared video of the moment on Facebook.

A young man with Down Syndrome was overcome with raw emotion after his older brother revealed that he had gotten a tattoo of him on his arm. Enamored, the younger brother, Erick, repeatedly ran his hands over the image, which showed his face inside the mouth of a lion. The gesture so moved him that he gave his older brother, Rafa, a kiss, and then a long embrace.

“Look at my puppy’s reaction to the beautiful tribute, his face tattooed inside a lion’s mouth. The video is EXCITING. That’s why I saw Rafa asking Erick to make a brave face,” wrote Soares Sheila, before adding, “My dear friends, when I posted this video I could swear that it would not cause this dimension of sharing that caused.”

Watch below:

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Actress Ellen Page Comes Out as Trans: ‘My Name is Elliot’

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*The actress formerly known as Ellen Page has penned a candid post shared on social media about her trans identity. Page now identifies as Elliot. Elliot Page. 

“Hi friends. I want to share with you that I am trans, my pronouns are he/they and my name is Elliot. I feel lucky to be writing this. To be here. To have arrived at this place in my life,” the Umbrella Academy star wrote. “I feel overwhelming gratitude for the incredible people who have supported me along this journey. I can’t begin to express how remarkable it feels to finally love who I am enough to pursue my authentic self.”

READ MORE: Laverne Cox Opens Up About Transphobic Attack in Los Angeles [VIDEO]

Page, 33, who came out as queer in 2014, noted that he has been “endlessly inspired” by fellow members of the LGBTQ community.

“I also ask for patience. My joy is real, but it is also fragile,” the “Juno” star continued. “The truth is, despite feeling profoundly happy right now and knowing how much privilege I carry, I am also scared. I’m scared of the invasiveness, the hate, the ‘jokes’ and of violence. To be clear, I am not trying to dampen a moment that is joyous and one that I celebrate, but I want to address the full picture. The statistics are staggering. … In 2020 alone, it has been reported that at least 40 transgender people have been murdered, the majority of which were Black and Latinx trans women.”

Page goes on to urge political leaders to do mote to hold accountable those “who continue to spew hostility towards the trans community,” adding “enough is enough.” 

“I love that I am trans,” he concluded. “And I love that I am queer. And the more I hold myself close to fully embrace who I am, the more I dream, the more my heart grows and the more I thrive. To all trans people who deal with harassment, self-loathing, abuse and the threat of violence every day: I see you, I love you and I will do everything I can to change this world for the better.”

Read his full post via the Twitter embed above. 

Do you think Page’s trans identity will help or hurt his career? Let us know in the comments. 

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Ice-T Says Father-in-Law ‘On Oxygen Indefinitely’ After Battling COVID-19

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*Ice-T has shared an update about the health status of his wife Coco Austin’s father who contracted the novel virus over the summer.

We previously reported… the rapper’s father-in-law Steve had to be hospitalized in Arizona in July due to the coronavirus. Ice says Steve is now “on Oxygen indefinitely.” 

“My father-in-law ‘Coco’s dad’ was a serious ‘No Masker’ COVID hit him,” the “Law & Order” star wrote on Twitter on Monday. “Pneumonia in both lungs.. 40 days in ICU close to death.. Now he’s on Oxygen indefinitely.”

READ MORE: Ice-T Says Wife’s Father Has Permanent Lung Damage From Coronavirus [VIDEO}

Ice-T also shared a photo of his father-in-law wearing an oxygen mask, writing, “Ohhh he’s a Believer now.. #COVIDisNotAGame.”

The hip-hip icon previously told Jimmy Fallon, “Coco’s dad is a Harley Davidson-riding, no-masking type of dude,” he said. “[Coronavirus] put him on his back.”

He went on to explain that Steve had pneumonia in both lungs, and was almost put on a ventilator.

“It took him a month to make it out of the hospital,” he said. “Now he’s home, but his lungs are damaged indefinitely.”

He also said during his appearance on The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon that it took his father-in-law “a month to make it out of the hospital.”

“There are still non-believers,” he said. “I’ve made it through so much in my life, I don’t want to die because of this — especially with a new daughter. I’m aware and I’m concerned and I’m cautious.”

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