Sunday, October 2, 2022

Inside the 2019 ‘Wearable Art Gala’ Presented by Richard Lawson and Tina Knowles-Lawson

*Richard Lawson and Tina Knowles-Lawson hosted the 2019 Wearable Art Gala over the weekend at The Barker Hanger in Santa Monica, CA.

This year’s theme was “A Journey to the Pride Lands,” inspired by Beyoncé’s role as “Nala” in the upcoming Walt Disney feature, THE LION KING.

Beyoncé dazzled in a gold one-piece and cape adorned with a lion’s face. Her Destiny’s child group members Kelly Rowland and Michelle Williams also in attendance, serving as co-chairs of the event.

The event began three years ago to celebrate fine art and toast African American artists. The evening was sponsored by Disney, Shea Moisture and LiveNation. Guests were treated to a dinner that featured New Orleans style cuisine, a second line, performances by Grammy Award winning artist Maxwell and the Broadway cast of “The Lion King”

The host for the evening was Tiffany Haddish and Star Jones served as auctioneer. $2 million dollars was raised to benefit the teen mentorship programs, Tina’s Angels, Richard’s Warriors and the WACO Theater, including a bid of over $100,000 for a Nipsey Hussle portrait (see it below) done by Tiffanie Anderson.

JUSSIE SMOLLETT SECRETLY MARRIED THIS HOLLYWOOD DIRECTOR: REPORT

via @ThePrettyArtist

WACO stands for Where Art Can Occur, and the space is dedicated to the empowerment of artists within the diversified pool of LA communities.

Honorees for the evening included Tyler PerryBetye Saar, Felicia Horowitz and Richelieu Dennis. The star-studded guest list featured; Chris Tucker, Marsai Martin, Robin Givens, Steve Harvey, Magic Johnson, Lee Daniels, author Terry McMillion, Vanessa Bell Calloway, Issa Rae, her Insecure co-star Kendrick Sampson, Affion Crocket, Chloe x Halle, rapper Saweetie and “The Lion King” director Jon Favreau 

EURweb’s Jill Munroe was on the red carpet and spoke with Knowles-Lawson about why it’s important to expose young black children to art and provide a space for them.

“When my children were growing up, the house was filled with images of African and African-American women, so that they would know and not have one standard of beauty from the TV. That’s really important, to see these proud kingly- like images…that shows how resilient we are.”

YOU MAY LIKE

SEARCH

THE CULTURECALENDAR: WHAT'S NEW & BLACK ON TV

- Advertisement -

TRENDING