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Rough Cut – Nigeria Marks Diamond Jubilee Since Independence

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NIGERIA at 60 Page 1a - FIN - EURWEB

NIGERIA at 60 Page 1 - FIN - EURWEB

*It is Black history month all throughout the month of October in the United Kingdom.

And as a reminder of why Black History matters, OUR ROOTS throws the spotlight on Nigeria marking 60 years of independence from Britain.

Each week here on EURweb, key events of its history will be highlighted through illustrations. 60 years of history since independence cannot be wiped away. Happy independence Day to all Nigerians.

Virtual Cartoon Exhibition

The virtual CARTAN Cartoon Exhibition of cartoons by Nigerian cartoonists also opens today to mark Nigeria’s Independence and it is accessible by visiting www.cartan.org

TAYO Fatunla

TAYO Fatunla

TAYO Fatunla is an award-winning Nigerian Comic Artist, Editorial Cartoonist, Writer and Illustrator. He is one of the participants of the CARTAN Virtual cartoon exhibition marking 60 years of Nigeria. He is a graduate of the prestigious Kubert School, in New Jersey, US. and recipient of the 2018 ECBACC Pioneer Lifetime Achievement Award for his illustrated OUR ROOTS creation and series – Famous people in Black History – He participated in the UNESCO’s Cartooning In Africa forum held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia and the Cartooning Global Forum in Paris, France and took part in the Afropolitan Comics virtual comics exhibition arranged by the French Institute in South Africa coinciding with its annual National Arts Festival –www.tayofatunla.com/[email protected]

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Africa

South African Rhinos Dehorned to Deter Poachers

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Rhino - dehorned1
Rhino - dehorned

Nature conservation has a new twist.

Hundreds of endangered rhinos in South Africa have been dehorned to protect them from poachers.

As international borders that were closed amid the coronavirus pandemic reopen, the country’s government has warned game reserves to prepare for a possible resurgence in rhino poaching. Poachers often hunt the animals in order to sell their horns, typically as a form of traditional medicine, for high prices on the black market.

As a result, conservationists in the province of North West have begun dehorning hundreds of rhinos in the area. Tracking the rhinos requires two helicopters and several teams of people on the ground, who then tranquilize the animals before removing their horns.

Description: Hundreds of rhinos in game reserves in the North West have been dehorned to protect them from poachers. Note: Picture is a screenshot. (Newsflash)

Nico Jacobs, the founder of Rhino 911, a conservation group that works to protect rhinos from poachers by cutting off their horns, is assisting with the efforts in North West.

“As soon as the lockdown hit South Africa, we started having incursions almost every day,” he said, noting dehorning the animals may be their best chance for survival.

Dr. Lynne MacTavish of the Mankwe Wildlife Reserve has also made it her life’s mission to save the rhinos. While she previously did not support dehorning the animals, one of her female rhinos was “poached in the most brutal way” in 2014. Afterwards, she decided dehorning them was the best way to preserve their dwindling numbers.

Description: Hundreds of rhinos in game reserves in the North West have been dehorned to protect them from poachers. Note: Picture is a screenshot. (Newsflash)

Around 500,000 rhinos roamed Africa and Asia at the beginning of the 20th century. However, just 27,000 remain in the wild today. Few tend to survive outside national parks and reserves, due to both poaching and habitat loss. Three rhino species, including the black rhino, Javan rhino and Sumatran rhino, are all critically endangered.

In Africa, the southern white rhino was once thought to be extinct, but the population is now bouncing back and thriving in protected sanctuaries. The continent’s western black rhino and northern white rhino were both recently determined to be extinct in the wild, and just two remaining northern white rhinos are housed at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya under 24-hour protection.

Description: Rhino 911, a conservation group, decided to hunt down rhinos to cut off their horns to save them from becoming the target of poachers, who kill them to sell the horns as a form of traditional medicine. Note: Picture is a screenshot. (Newsflash)

South Africa specifically is home to about 80% of the world’s remaining rhinos and has been the country most impacted by the poaching crisis, which began in 2008 and peaked in 2015.

From 2013 to 2017, more than 1,000 rhinos in the nation were hunted annually. Poaching numbers have decreased since, and just under 600 rhinos were killed in South Africa last year, according to the South African Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries.

For security reasons, South African authorities could not provide the exact number of rhinos already dehorned.

(Edited by Carlin Becker and Fern Siegel)



The post South African Rhinos Dehorned To Deter Poachers appeared first on Zenger News.

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Meet Queen Victoria’s Black Goddaughter: New Portrait of Sarah Forbes Bonetta on Display (Video)

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Artist Hannah Uzor’s new portrait of Queen Victoria’s African goddaughter on display

*A new portrait of Queen Victoria’s black goddaughter, Sarah Forbes Bonetta, is now on view at Osborne, the seaside home created by the Queen and Prince Albert.

Per a statement, the painting—created by artist Hannah Uzor—is based on a photograph currently housed at the National Portrait Gallery in London. It’s one of a series of works commissioned by English Heritage to spotlight historical black figures whose stories have previously been overlooked.

“What I find interesting about Sarah is that she challenges our assumptions about the status of black women in Victorian Britain,” says Uzor, whose family and children share Bonetta’s Nigerian heritage, in the statement. “ … To see Sarah return to Osborne, her godmother’s home, is very satisfying and I hope my portrait will mean more people discover her story.”

sara

Sarah Forbes Bonetta, as seen in 1856 (left) and 1862 (right). Hannah Uzor’s new portrait is based on the 1862 photograph. (L: Royal Collection Trust / © Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II 2020 and R: National Portrait Gallery)

Per Smithsonian.com:

Bonetta was born into a prominent Yoruba family in 1843. When she was 5 years old, a rival king, Gezo of Dahomey (located in what is now Benin), defeated her tribe. Historians say Gezo killed the young girl’s parents and enslaved her, forcing her to fulfill “whatever role was required of her” at the Dahomey court. Bonetta ended up in England as the result of a failed diplomatic mission. In 1850, British Captain Frederick Forbes tried—and failed—to convince Gezo to abandon his role in the slave trade. The king gifted Bonetta to the captain as an act of conciliation; Forbes, in turn, brought the orphaned child back to his home country, renaming her after himself and the ship on which they’d arrived.

Watch a report about Sarah’s story and the painting below:

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Africa

OUR ROOTS on Nigeria – Here’s to the Next 60

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OUR ROOTS - NIGERIA @ 60a - 2 - EURWEB

OUR ROOTS - NIGERIA @ 60 - 2 - EURWEB*Last week, on 1st October, Nigeria marked its 60th Independence Anniversary and will do so throughout October, in a subdued manner due to Covid-19.

The celebration continues on digital formats such as social media, as well as in places where with social distancing, small gatherings are permitted. This week, OUR ROOTS continues to highlight significant events, people, and places that have helped shape the nation’s history.

Nigeria was once a British Colony and ironically, Britain is also celebrating Black History month in October, with an emphasis on the importance of why Black History matters.

TAYO Fatunla

TAYO Fatunla

TAYO Fatunla is an award-winning Nigerian Comic Artist, Editorial Cartoonist, Writer and Illustrator and one of the participants of the CARTAN Virtual cartoon exhibition.He is a graduate of the prestigious Kubert School, in New Jersey, US. and recipient of the 2018 ECBACC Pioneer Lifetime Achievement Award for his illustrated OUR ROOTS creation and series – Famous people in Black History – He participated in the UNESCO’s Cartooning In Africa forum held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia and the Cartooning Global Forum in Paris, France and he also took part in the Afropolitan Comics virtual comics exhibition arranged by the French Institute of South Africa coinciding with its annual National Arts Festival –www.tayofatunla.com

 

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