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Muhammad Ali Jr. Says His Dad Would Have Hated ‘Racist’ Black Lives Matter & Calls Protesters ‘Devils’

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Muhammad Ali - Muhammad ali Jr (Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images, Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Muhammad Ali – Muhammad ali Jr (Getty)

*Well now, this is interesting and is sure to turn more than a few heads. We’re referring to a new article in which Muhammad Ali Jr. says his famous father, Muhammad Ali would not be down with Black Lives Matter, calling the movement “racist” and the protesters “devils.”

Ali Jr. says his dad, who stood up to racism when he was alive, would have been sickened by how the protests have turned to violence and looting after the death of George Floyd.

“Don’t bust up s–t, don’t trash the place,” he told The New York Post. “You can peacefully protest.

‘‘My father would have said, ‘They ain’t nothing but devils.’ My father said, ‘all lives matter.’ I don’t think he’d agree.”

As far as the Black lives Matter movement, on the fourth anniversary of his father’s death, Ali Jr., a Muslim like his father, said: “I think it’s racist.”

“It’s not just black lives matter, white lives matter, Chinese lives matter, all lives matter, everybody’s life matters. God loves everyone — he never singled anyone out. Killing is wrong no matter who it is,” Ali said during an hour-long interview with The Post.

RELATED: Muhammad Ali Jr. Caught Up in Trump’s Muslim Ban; Detained at Florida Airport

muhammad-ali-jr-at-hearing

Muhammad Ali Jr. arrives for a forum in Washington, Thursday, March 9, 2017, on the effects of President Trump’s immigration policies

On police brutality, Ali Jr. defended law enforcement in general in the interview.

“Police don’t wake up and think, ‘I’m going to kill a n—-r today or kill a white man,’” he said. “They’re just trying to make it back home to their family in one piece.

Speaking of Floyd’s killing at the knee of a white Minneapolis police officer, here’s what Ali Jr. had to say:

“The officer was wrong with killing that person, but people don’t realize there was more footage than what they showed. The guy resisted arrest, the officer was doing his job, but he used the wrong tactic.”

muhammad-ali-jr-mother2

Muhammad Ali Jr. and his mother, Khalilah Camacho-Ali

He even agrees with President Trump that Antifa fomented violence during the Floyd protests and should be labeled a terrorist organization.

“They’re no different from Muslim terrorists. They should all get what they deserve. They’re f–king up businesses, beating up innocent people in the neighborhood, smashing up police stations and shops. They’re terrorists – they’re terrorizing the community. I agree with the peaceful protests, but the Antifa, they need to kill everyone in that thing.

“Black Lives Matter is not a peaceful protest. Antifa never wanted it peaceful. I would take them all out.”

Lord have mercy, Muhammad Ali Jr. has issues as far as we’re concerned.  Something tells us that if his daddy was alive we don’t think they would be on the same page as far as BLM and a LOT of other things are concerned. And speaking of concerned, that’s the word we’re thinking of when we think of Muhammad Ali Jr. at this point.

 

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‘Bachelorette’ Star Tayshia Adams Gets Emotional During Rare Conversation About Race [VIDEO]

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*“Bachelorette”Star Tayshia Adams opened up about racism and the Black Lives Matter movement during a rare conversation about race on the hit dating series.

Adams confessed to biracial contestant Ivan Hall on Tuesday’s episode that the death of George Floyd changed her perspective as a Black/Latina woman. She became emotional during their date while explaining her experience as a woman of color in America.

 “Being in Orange County and surrounded by a lot of people that don’t look like me — being the only person that looks like me — I’m realizing that I’ve been trying so hard my whole life to blend in because I knew I was different,” said Adams of her California upbringing. “I didn’t really want to cry about it or open up about it, but hearing people yell ‘Black Lives Matter,’ it hit me more than I realize just because those are people in my backyard that I’ve been trying to prove for so long that I’m the same as them.”

READ MORE: Muslim Model Halima Aden Will No Longer Walk Runways After Losing ‘Touch with Who I Was’

Hall also shared his own experience as man of color, and recalled how his younger brother was mistreated in prison by correctional officers. 

Adamsl told the camera, “He understands me more than anybody else can. That’s obviously what I’ve been looking for.”

The casting of Adams and the discussion about race comes months after Rachel Lindsay, the franchise’s first Black lead, called out the “Bachelor” franchise for “systemic racism.”

In response, producers diversified the popular series both in front of and behind the camera. 

“We made a concerted effort, before the pandemic, to make better strides for diversity and let people see themselves and their love represented on the show,” host and producer Chris Harrison told The Hollywood Reporter. “I think the best thing we ever did was realizing and admitting there was an issue, and then saying, ‘Let’s get to work and let’s do better.'”

Speaking to the publication earlier in the season about starring on the show, Adams said: “Not only am I African American, but I am Mexican, and I’m going to have an opportunity to have a platform to relate to so many women who look like me, who haven’t had the opportunity to relate to someone in the past. How can you not want to take that opportunity and be an amazing role model for people? That was something that I took on and was really excited to be able to do.”

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Prominent Breonna Taylor Activist Fatally Shot in Louisville

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Hamza "Travis" Nagdy
Hamza "Travis" Nagdy - twitter

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*Hamza “Travis” Nagdy, a young protest leader known for calling out the injustice done to Breonna Taylor, was shot and killed early Monday morning in Louisville, Kentucky. 

Nagdy, 21, was reportedly the victim of a suspected car jacking. According to USA Today, he was transported to University of Louisville Hospital, where he later died as a result of his injuries.

The Louisville Metro Police Department is investigating, and no suspects have been identified.

Nagdy is the the latest grassroots leader/advocate against anti-police brutality to die in a random attack that progressive and woke Black folk are giving the side-eye to. 

READ MORE: Cori Bush Says GOP Lawmakers Thought She was Breonna Taylor [VIDEO]

Hamza "Travis" Nagdy - twitter

“He’s irreplaceable,” said Antonio T-Made Taylor, an independent reporter who mentored the victim. “Travis really believed he could help change systemic racism. He believed he could be a big part of that change.

“What I’m hoping is he will become a symbol of the violence that’s going on, and people will finally give it the attention that we need to be giving to this record number of homicides in our city. …We’re just hoping that he will become a symbol of what great lives we are going to lose if we don’t wrap a movement around what’s going on.”

Maxwell Mitchell, who participated in many summer protests in Louisville, described Nagdy as a man with “a strong sense of strength, a sense of willingness to spend and give everything he had toward this” during a live video on Monday. 

“I can only assume that that energy is going to waft over all of us like a wildfire,” Mitchell said.

“Travis really believed he could help change systemic racism. He believed he could be a big part of that change,” said Taylor.

“What I’m hoping is he will become a symbol of the violence that’s going on, and people will finally give it the attention that we need to be giving to this record number of homicides in our city. …We’re just hoping that he will become a symbol of what great lives we are going to lose if we don’t wrap a movement around what’s going on,” he added. 

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Amazon Banned, Un-Banned Doc About Michael Brown’s Death that Indicts ‘American liberalism’ / WATCH

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Michael Brown

*ST. AUGUSTINE, Florida — An African-American scholar who regularly upends the way mainstream U.S culture views race politics says white guilt and “enormously seductive” post-1960s liberalism, not racism, are responsible for the death of Michael Brown on a Ferguson, Missouri street in 2014.

Shelby Steele, a senior fellow at Stanford University’s Hoover Institute, has long raised the hackles of progressives with his views on race relations, multiculturalism and affirmative action. His new documentary What Killed Michael Brown?, a collaboration with his award-winning filmmaker son Eli Steele, turns the culturally dominant view about the unarmed black teenager’s death on its head.

“We wanted to understand what really happened in Ferguson. What did it mean for us as Americans?” Eli told Zenger News. “And why had Americans responded to Ferguson the way it did? These questions about America’s response to Ferguson—not the actual shooting of Brown—were really what drove the focus of our documentary.”

TRAILER DEBUT: ‘MLK/FBI’ | Directed By Emmy Award-Winner Sam Pollard | Opens January 15

Award-winning filmmaker Eli Steele, in collaboration with his father Shelby Steele, released their new documentary “What Killed Michael Brown” to much acclaim. Eli Steele goes on the record with Zenger News. (Photo courtesy of Eli Steele)

The Steeles believe their conservative politics led to Amazon Prime Video initially pulling the plug on the documentary, which was slated to begin streaming on October 16. Amazon later reinstated the film.

“The film … is a unique take on race relations in the U.S. because it asks questions Black Lives Matter would not allow, for example, ‘Is Michael Brown in any way responsible for his own death?’” Steele said in a statement. “When Amazon decided to cancel [the film], they let themselves be captured by white guilt. Amazon doesn’t want justice for blacks, as they claim. They want the look of racial innocence attached to their brand.”

Amazon told the Steeles in an email that their film “doesn’t meet Prime Video’s content quality expectations” and that the company “will not be accepting resubmission of this title and this decision may not be appealed.”

Amazon did not respond to a request for comment.

The Poetic Truth

On screen, Shelby Steele stands in front of the Canfield Green apartment complex, just feet from where Michael Brown was killed and left in the street for four hours, while a narrator sets the tone: “Groups pass on their identity to their young by telling them cautionary tales, ‘Watch out for the whites.’ So if you’re black and you step outside of any of these apartments and see Michael Brown’s body … at that moment, before any evidence or witness testimony, all you can see is a victim of American racism.”

Steele’s unconventional approach is questionable, according to one scholar who argues that when black Americans talk about racism every individual has an individual story.

“Dr. Steele makes a long-standing argument that blacks are complicit in their own suffering,” said Dr. Donn Worgs, a political science professor and program director for the African and African American studies program at Towson University in Maryland. “It’s troubling to see people discount black people’s personal, lived experience. Any journalist worth his salt could go into [a black neighborhood in Ferguson] and talk to the people, and no doubt they’d all present different perspectives on how racism has touched them.”

Worgs says Steele is wrong to blame liberalism for Brown’s death, calling it a case of bad policing. That view is shared by the U.S. Department of Justice. “Black Lives Matter is a genius concept because it is critical of police violence and the systematic dehumanization of black people,” Worgs said. “Whether Brown committed a crime or not, he did not deserve to die. It’s not enough just to not kill innocent people; the police should not be killing guilty people either.”

Attorney General Eric Holder makes a separated statement on the unrest after the unarmed 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot by a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, during a major financial fraud announcement press conference August 21, 2014 at the Justice Department in Washington, DC. Holder spoke on the current situation in Ferguson one day after his visit to the town and met with Browns family, saying the investigation of the shooting will be thorough and will be fair, and Department of Justice stands with the people of Ferguson. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

White Guilt and Post-’60s Liberalism

The flip side of black victimization is white guilt, Steele says.

When U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder went to Ferguson in August 2014 to investigate Brown’s death, he came as both the nation’s top law enforcement official and “also as a black man,” leading some to believe his agenda was set beforehand and the Obama administration was already aligned against the Ferguson Police Department.

“Eric Holder came to Ferguson as an envoy of the Black Power movement, but there was no evidence of white racism in the shooting of Michael Brown,” Steele says in his film. “Where did he find the momentum to go on? I think it was white guilt. Since the ’60s, whites have lived under the accusation that they are racists. Thus, there is a compulsion to prove their innocence of racism. This compulsion is white guilt; it is not actual guilt.

“For Holder, it wasn’t just [police officer] Darren Wilson who pulled that trigger; it was the thousands of other officers dating back to the oppressions of slavery and segregation. The weight of all of that history is the measure of systemic racism today.”

Steele said modern American liberalism falsely promises to remove blacks from the grips of white supremacy.

“Back in the ’60s, we blacks made a very bad deal with America. We demanded that America help us develop,” he said. “But if that was logical, it was also naive. It seduced us into putting our faith right back into the hands of the same white America that had oppressed us in the first place.

“The liberalism that insists on Michael Brown being a victim of racism also makes him an invisible man. We have no chance to know what really ailed him when he arrived at that profoundly bad decision to slam his fist into the officer’s face, wrestle him for his gun and make that final, fateful charge at Officer Wilson. I don’t believe racism drove Darren Wilson to shoot Michael Brown. I think the motive was so simple as to be unbelievable: He feared for his life.”

Despite initial allegations that Brown poetically surrendered, hands in the air, before Wilson shot him dead, an investigation later proved that “Hands up, don’t shoot” was a fabrication.

Wilson was justified in using deadly force, Steele said.

Holder’s report concluded “that Ferguson police officers routinely violate the Fourth Amendment in stopping people without reasonable suspicion, arresting them without probable cause and using unreasonable force against them.”

ST. LOUIS, MO – NOVEMBER 26 : Demonstrators protest the shooting death of Michael Brown November 26, 2014 in St. Louis, Missouri. Brown, a 18-year-old black male teenager was fatally wounded by Darren Wilson, a white Ferguson Police officer on August 9, 2014. A St. Louis County 12-member grand jury who reviewed evidence related to the shooting decided not to indict Wilson with charges sparking riots through out Ferguson. (Photo by Joshua Lott/Getty Images)

Black Conservatism in the Arena

Steele does have supporters who stick their necks out routinely to stir America’s race discussion.

“Black Lives Matter doesn’t give a damn about blacks. They care about a narrative based on Marxism and being an adjunct of the Democratic Party,” said Clarence McKee, a former Reagan administration official and author of How Obama Failed Black America and How Trump Is Helping It. “If you don’t think like they do, you can get blacked out in much of the mainstream media and corporate America. They do know how to make people feel guilty.”

Like the Steeles, McKee is a critic of “Critical Race Theory,” an academic discipline that drives much of today’s race politics.

Steele’s son, Eli, agreed. “The problem with the systemic racism argument is that it comes out of the Critical Race Theory, which demands that everything be viewed through racial lenses. While racism may explain things in some cases, it is often the exception and not the rule,” said the younger Steele.

Shelby Steele, research fellow at the Hoover Institution in Stanford, CA sits for a portrait in this undated photo. Shelby, who’s study specialty is race relations, multiculturalism, and affirmative action has published several books and articles on those subjects and has appeared on numerous national affairs and news programs. He is against slave reparations. (File photo courtesy of the Hoover Institution/Getty Images)

Big Tech as Censor?

Shelby Steele believes Amazon risked a massive backlash by trying to silence him, and predicts both ends of the political spectrum don’t like when billion-dollar technology companies play favorites.

“Political pressure is building on the left, which dislikes Big Tech’s success and size; and on the right, which resents its leftward bias in suppressing cultural messages it doesn’t want people to hear,” said Sandye McIntyre, an IT and management consultant.

“Amazon Prime Video isn’t a journalistic enterprise/news media outlet; it’s a content and distribution platform,” McIntyre said. “The leadership of many media and tech companies are biased, either toward the left or the right, but all are biased toward financial benefit, risk aversion and long-term survival.”

McIntyre also believes online platforms have an obligation to ensure they’re not providing a platform for misinformation and disinformation.

“The progressive roots of the Black Lives Matter movement have been falsely recast as violent, anti-American anarchy,” he said. “It’s possible that Amazon didn’t want to be complicit in smearing the movement … by streaming the documentary.”

(Edited by Allison Elyse Gualtieri and Anne Denbok.)



The post Amazon Banned, Un-Banned Documentary about Michael Brown’s Death that Indicts ‘American liberalism’ appeared first on Zenger News.

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