Friday, July 1, 2022

Family Members’ Domestic Violence Murders ‘MOVE’ a Mother to Act-The Story on ID’s ‘Impact of Murder’ Thursday (10/1) (EUR EXCLUSIVE!)

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OCTOBER IS DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AWARENESS MONTH 

*Each year, the month of October brings Domestic Violence Awareness to the forefront. The finale of Investigation Discovery’s (ID) “Impact of Murder” kicks off this important month by profiling Corrinna Martin, who lost two daughters and a granddaughter to domestic violence. The episode called “There’s No Winning in Murder,” premieres Thursday, October 1 at 9 p.m. ET/PT.

In a phone interview with the EUR, Martin said that while she may not have been ready to tell her story on camera, she knew it was something she had to do.

“I was completely skeptical because we as black and brown women are not treated and depicted the way we should be or respected in the media the way we should be,” Martin said. “But after talking with one of the executive producers, she assured me it would be done very respectfully with sensitivity to myself, my family, and our devastation.”

She continued, “I knew I had to speak on behalf of my daughters (Alyssiah Wiley and Chaquinequea Brodie) and my granddaughter (My’Jaeaha Richardson). But (doing the show) was also to be an example to women that we have to be extremely careful (with dating and domestic violence), especially our black and brown women.”

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Corrinna Martin, mother of Chaquinequea Brodie and Alyssiah Wiley. (Photo Credit: Investigation Discovery)

Hailing from West Haven, Connecticut, Martin’s harrowing story began in early 2013 when her daughter Alyssiah, who was in college, was murdered and dismembered. After it was discovered that Alyssiah suffered from a pattern of abuse by a boyfriend, just a few short months later Martin set up the domestic violence program Mothers of Victim Equality (M.O.V.E. Inc.) to help other victims.

“When Alyssiah was murdered, I vowed that she would not be another black woman forgotten,” Martin said.

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Alyssiah Wiley (Photo Credit: M.O.V.E. Inc.)

It was hard to find justice for Alyssiah’s murder because due to a lack of physical evidence against the suspect, two trials resulted in hung juries. Just weeks before the third trial, an additional tragedy struck – another of Martin’s daughter’s (Chaquinequea) and granddaughter were killed in yet a second domestic violence situation. What keeps Martin going is having faith in a higher power and the memory of her family members.

“It’s their spirit, drive, and tenacity they had for life – that’s what’s driving me,” Martin said. “It’s not going to stop.”

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Chaquinequea Brodie in green. (Photo Credit: M.O.V.E. Inc.)

Ironically, Chaquinequea was serving as the Vice President of M.O.V.E. when she was killed.

“The most dangerous time for a woman is getting out of a volatile situation,” Martin added. “I had to continue on. I don’t want another mother to go through this. There’s more that we can do instead of waiting until after the fact – promote proactivity, engage not just those that are around you but the community as a whole. Empower those that are in situations that feel like they can’t get out or want to get out but don’t have the means of getting out.”

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My’Jaeaha Richardson (Photo Credit: M.O.V.E. Inc.)

If the pain of a second daughter and granddaughter being killed was not enough, Martin, the mother of four daughters altogether, said the legal system also failed them a second time.

“(Chaquinequea) knew about doing searches and background checks,” Martin said. “But I had to pivot in my plight and in our mission (at M.O.V.E.) to bring awareness, reeducation and to empower, encourage and engage. (I had) to propose a National Violent Offenders Registry petition because the person she was dating had multiple offenses but they weren’t in the state that he lived in.”

Martin added that current offender registries are very limiting, which is why she hopes her proposal works.

“It wasn’t until afterwards that I found out (the suspect) did have a few charges but because they weren’t public knowledge (the information could not be found easily). I’m proposing a registry that’s free of charge so that it will be an excellent tool to safeguard our women, children, and communities from perpetrators who go from victim to victim.”

She continued, “There are so many specifics you have to know (middle name/place of birth) that it’s very frustrating. The more information you need, the more you have to pay. It’s like why do we have to pay for our safety? We have a right to protect ourselves and if we want our government to provide this most essential information then we need to do something in order to make them see and that’s why I created (the) petition on change.org. (Read about it and find it here).

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Chaquinequea Brodie (left), My’Jaeaha Richardson (top right). and Alyssiah Wiley (bottom right). (Photo Credit: M.O.V.E. Inc.)

The death of Martin’s family members causes pause because they are all African American females. Statistics show that black and brown women are affected by domestic violence more than their white counterparts. According to the Blackburn Center, black women are 2.5x more likely to be murdered than white women.

“The numbers are more overwhelming when you understand that it’s happening from black men to black women,” Martin said. “It’s highly important that the takeaway from our documentary is to be aware that because of the subtleties you may think that you are not in that kind of a situation. It’s not just physical abuse, it’s emotional, financial, and sexual.”

Martin continued, “They were very subtle for my girls. You don’t look for intimidation and being controlling as part of domestic violence. It falls under emotional, psychological, and physiological because when you’re beaten down physically and emotionally it takes a toll on your body. We get so disrespected and have this reputation as being the ‘angry black woman,’ (people) do not really understand the struggles we go through just to maintain our sanity throughout the day.”

Martin added that one factor that black women may be affected more by domestic violence is fear that her significant other may be another black man in the penal system.

“Yes, it plays a lot on not putting them in the system. I talk about not carrying your perpetrators guilt. And that’s what we do a lot of times. We want to be mothering and understanding of our mate’s plight but at the same time we’re the ones getting beat down.”

ID’s “Impact of Murder” – “There’s No Winning in Murder” airs on Thursday, October 1 at 9 p.m. ET/PT.

For more information on Corrinna Martin’s M.O.V.E. Inc. organization, go here.

If you or a family member is a victim of domestic violence and/or sexual abuse, find agencies in your state/country by going to HotPeach Pages and get the help you need.

 

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