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Sealed Transcripts in Breonna Taylor Case to be Released After Juror Files Lawsuit Seeking ‘Justice’

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*A recording of the grand jury in the Breonna Taylor case will be made public after a juror filed to have the sealed transcripts and records released “so that the truth may prevail.”

The motion, filed in Jefferson County on Monday (Sept. 28), also asked that the jury members be allowed to speak freely about the highly publicized case, Fox News reports. 

“There is compelling public interest for these proceedings to be released of a magnitude the city and Commonwealth have never seen before that could not be confined, weaving its way across the country,” the court documents said. “The citizens of the Commonwealth have demonstrated their lack of faith in the process and proceedings in this matter and the justice system itself.”

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron announced last week that a grand jury had chosen not to issue indictments on homicide charges against any of the three officers who fired shots during the deadly botched police raid on Taylor’s apartment on March 13. 

Taylor was shot six times when officers opened fire after her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, shot at police first during a no-knock warrant execution.

Walker has said he believed the officers were intruders.

READ MORE: Candace Owens Claps Back at Criticism of GOP Kentucky AG Over Handling of Breonna Taylor Case [VIDEO]

Cops who murdered Breonna Taylor

Jonathan Mattingly, Myles Cosgrove, Brett Hankison (photo via Twitter.com)

Former detective Brett Hankison, who was fired in June, is the only officer facing charges in Taylor’s case. The charges do not relate to Taylor, but rather for shooting into her white neighbor’s apartment where three people were present, including a child. He pleaded not guilty to the charges Monday.

Cameron agreed to comply with a judge’s ruling to release the grand jury transcripts on Wednesday. Cameron is concerned that the move could lead to a “poisoning of the jury pool.”

“The grand jury is meant to be a secretive body,” Cameron said in a statement released Monday night. “It’s apparent that the public interest in this case isn’t going to allow that to happen.”

During his announcement, Cameron said the jury agreed that the other two officers connected to Taylor’s killing were justified in their actions. 

“The attorney general publicly made many statements that referenced what the grand jury heard and decisions that were made based on what certain witnesses said,” the court document said. “He further laid those decisions at the feet of the grand jury while failing to answer specific questions regarding the charges presented. Cameron attempted to make it clear that the grand jury alone made the decision on who and what to charge based solely on the evidence presented to them.”

“The interest of the individual grand jurors is parallel to the public but also manifests as fears of persecution, condemnation, retribution, and torment. Unfortunately, they do not get to hide behind an entity, person office,” the statement continued.

The filing noted that Cameron chose his words wisely.

“Now he has another choice in his response. Choose truth,” the document said. “Choose justice. Together Kentucky.”

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Family - Parenting - Births

Family of Detroit Woman Mistakenly Declared Dead Suing City for $50 Million

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Timesha Beauchamp

*The family of the Detroit woman with cerebral palsy who was mistakenly declared dead at a funeral home in August has filed a lawsuit against the first responders on the scene

According to PEOPLE, Beauchamp’s family has sued the Southfield EMS Paramedics for $50 million for declaring her dead when she was “very much alive,” family attorney Geoffrey Fieger said in a statement.

“All the telemetry evidence shows that Timesha was alive when EMS declared her dead,” he said in a statement. “As a result of being declared dead, she was left without oxygen for 4 hours, suffering severe hypoxic brain damage.”

The four paramedics involved have had their licenses suspended, Fieger said.

“All of this could have been avoided, had more care been taken,” he added.

READ MORE: Woman Found Alive at Funeral Home Dies of ‘Massive Brain Damage’

We previously reported, Beauchamp, 20, died at Detroit’s Children’s Hospital on Sunday of massive brain damage. Her death comes two months after she was discovered alive at a Detroit funeral home.

“This is the second time our beloved Timesha has been pronounced dead, but this time she isn’t coming back,” the family said in a statement

Beauchamp had a heart attack at her home in August and was found unresponsive when paramedics with Southfield Fire Department arrived. They performed CPR and failed to revive her after performing life saving procedures for 30 minutes, according to CBS.  She was declared dead after an ER physician reviewed her medical data. Her body was released directly to the family and Beauchamp was transported to James H Cole Home for Funerals in Detroit. 

Over an hour later, staffers saw she was alive and called paramedics, who rushed her to the hospital.  

“They would have begun draining her blood to be very, very frank about it,” the family’s lawyer Geoffrey Fieger told WXYZ-TV. “The funeral home unzipping the body bag – literally – that’s what happened to Timesha, and seeing her alive with her eyes open.” 

“After receiving clearance from the Oakland County Medical Examiner’s office she was transported to our funeral home,” the funeral home said in a statement to PEOPLE. “Upon her arrival at the funeral home, our staff confirmed she was breathing and called EMS.”

The fire department claims they followed “protocols and procedures” when handling Beauchamp.  

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Terrence Howard Sues 20th Century Fox; Says Use of His Image on ‘Empire’ Logo is Unauthorized

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Terrence Howard

Terrence Howard  (Photo by FOX via Getty Images)

*So, is his money funny now that “Empire” is gone and he’s no longer employed by 20th Century Fox Television?

Well, that could be the case, but what we do know is that Terrence Howard‘s case against them is over their use of his likeness to promote the former hit Fox TV show about a family owned record label and all the drama that came with it.

In any event, the actor is accusing 20th Century Fox TV officials of using his likeness from the movie “Hustle & Flow” to promote “Empire.”

Howard, who played Lucious Lyon on the show for 6 seasons, says the bosses at Fox TV failed to offer a satisfactory answer when he asked how they came up with the “Empire” logo – since he never sat for a photoshoot.

GOOD BUSINESS MOVE: Dr. Fredrick Jacobs, CEO of Celebrity’s Soul Food Talks Launch of Franchise

Empire logo-745x596

He says he ultimately determined the image was taken from the “Hustle & Flow” scene where “It’s Hard Out Here for a Pimp” was being recorded in a studio.

“The still frame was selected, reversed (face looking left, not right), and subjected to CGI that simply distilled the cinematographer’s skilled capture of the head with vibrant light and shadow.”

Howard insists he should be compensated for use of the image as he would have been paid by officials at Paramount – the studio behind Hustle & Flow – if 20th Century Fox got a proper license to use his image from the movie.

Howard is suing for damages and wants an accounting of all the Empire merchandise using the logo, according to TMZ.

Of course the key question is why did he wait until NOW to pursue this line of action? Hmm, maybe our question up top about money being funny is more appropriate than we first thought.

Speaking of thoughts, what are yours about this situation?

 

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San Francisco Supervisors Pass CAREN Act Banning Racially Biased 911 Calls (Video)

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karens-montage-620

*The vote was unanimous. The San Francisco Board of Supervisors approved legislation Tuesday banning false, racially-biased calls to 911, with all 11 supervisors voting yes.
Its name, the Caution Against Racial and Exploitative Non-Emergencies (CAREN) Act, is of course a nod to the widespread meme using the name “Karen” to describe a specific type of white, middle-aged woman, who exhibits behaviors that stem from privilege, such as using the police to target people of color.

“We want to make sure people don’t continue to weaponize emergency calls to law enforcement,” said Supervisor Shamann Walton, who authored the measure.

Under the CAREN Act, calls to 911 with the specific intent to discriminate over someone’s race, ethnicity, national origin, place of birth, sexual orientation, gender identity or religion is banned. Victims of such calls will also be allowed to sue the caller.

The CAREN Act will be voted again by the Board of Supervisors at next Tuesday’s meeting before heading to Mayor London Breed’s desk.

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TV Calendar: Coming to Small Screens

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