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Trump Supporters Accuse Cardi B and Sister of Defamation in New Lawsuit

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*Cardi B, her sister Hennessy Carolina and her sister’s girlfriend Michelle Diaz have been named in a defamation lawsuit seeking damages for a beach altercation with a group of Trump supporters.

Carolina and Diaz are accused of battering, assaulting, threatening and defaming three people who confronted them over parking ‘ettiqute’ at a New York beach earlier this month, MSN reports. 

According to a lawsuit filed in Suffolk County on Sept. 21, plaintiffs Peter Caliendo, Pauline Caliendo and Manuel Alarcon say Carolina started filming the interaction while “shouting foul and threatening language and defamatory statements.”

The suit claims Carolina “sprayed her copious spittle upon said plaintiffs as she raged.”

They also accuse her of using “racist” and threatening language such as  “F–k these n—-s before I bring my f—–g n—-s to beat your f—–g a– for real.”

Carolina published footage of the incident online to her  “9.5 million followers.” Cardi B also shared the video on social media.

READ MORE: Cardi B Ignored Offset’s Cheating ‘Because of the Baby,’ Says Source


The plantiffs claim the rapper, Carolina and Diaz edited the videos “to remove portions thereof, and thereby hold plaintiffs in a false light, so as to tend to expose and in fact expose each plaintiff to public contempt, ridicule and disgrace and harm,” and accusing the plaintiffs of “racism.”

“These peaceful Suffolk County residents were quietly enjoying a Sunday at the Smith Point beach with their families, when rap celebrity Hennessy Carolina suddenly approached them, raging, spitting, insulting, assaulting, defaming and threatening them, all the while videotaping them because one of them wore a MAGA hat,” John Ray, the plaintiffs’ attorney, told ABC New York. “Then Hennessy, Cardi B and celebrity model Michelle Diaz deviously edited the videotape and published the edited version all over social media, across the world for all to see, and maliciously falsely labeled these residents and their families as ‘N…s’ and as racists. … Real threats of harm were made. They live in fear now. Their reputations have been ruined.”

Cardi B tweeted audio of Carolina and Diaz discussing the situation. “We moved out of respect and you still came — two men — to us, and yelled ‘Get out of here; go to your f—–g country’ because you saw us parking here and we were speaking Spanish?” one of them can be heard saying.

Listen to the audio via the Twitter embed below.

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Kandy Apple Redd Raise Our Temperature with ‘Do Things’ Their Sexy Isotopia Records Debut

The Clinton Cousins take a bite of the Big Apple in a sleek new video in time for Autumn Central Park backdrop invokes memories of P-funk’s Cosmic Slop

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Kandy Apple Red DO THINGS SINGLE COVER ART1 1080x1080

*As Autumn comes and cooler weather prevails, Kandy Apple Redd, raise the temperature with with a new sexy sound on “Do Things” their Isotopia Records debut.

The video for “Do Things” helmed by award winning Director Gabriel ‘Video God’ Hart, depicts the seasons in New York City with the duo performing in many popular locations including Central Park and Times Square, celebrating the treasures of pre-pandemic New York – a ‘love letter’ of sorts to the beleaguered city in crisis. “Do Things” is streaming everywhere. [Via player above and http://lnk.to/DoThingsEL]

Cousins Tonysha Nelson and Patavian Lewis create melodic layers setting a mood that make lovers want to “Do Things” to one another.

The music video, produced by label head Constance Hauman, took a year to film and assemble in order to capture New York’s various moods.

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Kandy Apple Red – screenshot

As the granddaughters of legendary Funk and R&B maestro George Clinton, the Clinton cousins’ gift for music came naturally, but not without effort and commitment.

Kandy Apple Redd has been on the road for the past decade honing their craft performing in concert with Parliament-Funkadelic over 200 nights a year. It was on tour where they met Isotopia magic maker, Constance Hauman who pledged to work to polish their proverbial apple.

“Working on our “Do Things” video was an exciting experience. Being in Central Park, filming in the same spot our grandfather (George Clinton of Parliament-Funkadelic) filmed “Cosmic Slop”was euphoric, and as the New Yorkers watched us we felt a scense of gratification knowing we were carrying on the legacy”  Tonysha Nelson, Kandy Apple Redd

Named to the Hip-Hop 100, Gabriel “Video God” Hart is known for his work with Kendrick Lamar, Migos, Ne-yo, and  George Clinton among many other notables. “Working with Gabriel is always an inspiring experience” says Tonysha adding, “He pushes us to our best and makes us look amazing. He’s a pioneer in the game, so it’s always a pleasure!”  “Do Things” was the second professional pairing for Hart and Hauman who were the creative forces behind the epic multi-continent clip “Phat Blunt ft. George Clinton” by Isotopia labelmates, Miss Velvet and The Blue Wolf.

Premiering Monday October 19th at (AM PST / Noon EST) on YouTube, Kandy Apple Redd wants you to watch and decide who you want to “Do Things” to this cuffing season. [http://bit.ly/KARDoThings]

Connect with KAR
www.kandyappleredd.com
IG @kandyappleredd

 

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Steven Ivory: That Day I was Peggy ‘Mod Squad’ Lipton

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Peggy Lipton (Getty)

Mod Squad season 1 poster

*I didn’t care for Derek.  He had the kind of nervous energy grown-ups attributed to kids who ate too much sugar.

He talked too much, laughed too loud, and despite  Melvin’s mom’s  edict  for us to keep our  13 year-old selves   close to  home on that still, humid, lazy Oklahoma  City   Saturday afternoon—she said Melvin’s uncle was driving up from tiny Seminole, about 50 miles away  from us—Derek kept insisting the three of us abandon our perch on the peeling white banister along the front porch of Melvin’s family’s faded lemon clapboard house and go hang out at Washington Park.

When it was clear we weren’t budging, Derek introduced   another idea.

“Let’s play Mod Squad!”

“Cool,” said Melvin.

Before  he  or I could say anything else, Derek blurted,  “I’m Linc!”

Like most children, those in my predominantly Black, Eastside neighborhood played  pretend. You know—pretend to be someone or something you’re not: a cowboy,  fireman,  policeman,   soldier.  When we got older but still kids, we pretended to be characters from our favorite TV shows.   After it  made its premiere on ABC-TV in 1968,  one of our favorite things to play was  “The Mod Squad.”

The drama, starring 20-something white unknowns Michael Cole, Peggy Lipton and black newcomer Clarence Williams III, about a trio of young, hip undercover cops (“One Black, One White, One Blonde,” went the show’s catchphrase), might have seemed unbelievable, but in 1968, we  desperately  needed the escape.

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Martin Luther King (Getty)

Martin Luther King (Getty)

Think things are crazy today?  Consider 1968: On April 4th, six months  before  “Mod Squad”’s  debut,  the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated in Memphis.  It was one of the few times I saw mama  cry.  King’s murder cast a pall of anger, fear and hopelessness over black America, where, in several major cities,  riots broke out.

That  June, Democratic Senator and presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy,  younger brother of President  John F. Kennedy and the man on whom Black America hung its  last, anguished   political hope, was gunned down during a campaign appearance at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles.  Meanwhile,  the Viet Nam war,  under the direction of President   Lyndon Johnson,  raged on.

At least  “The  Mod Squad”’s  cool “counter culture” cops  took  a smidgen of edge off  how Blacks felt about law enforcement.  After all the horrific evening news images of Blacks being beaten water hosed and shot during  the nation’s civil unrest,  young  Black America was more than ready to see a Soul Brother like Williams’s Lincoln “Linc” Hayes character, with his together ‘fro, dark glasses and super cool demeanor, sock it to white crooks.  Clarence Williams would go on to an acting career of varied roles, notably, almost two decades later, as father to Prince‘s character  in “Purple Rain.” But in ’68, he was Linc, whose dramatic running dive while chasing down a bad guy became the trademark move every young, male black “Mod Squad”  fan imitated at least once.

But I’d never played “Mod Squad.” How could you,  with no  female around to be Lipton’s Julie Barnes?   See, when it came to pretend, I was adamant  about authenticity.  Some  people  have an aversion to different foods on their plate touching;  it was the same with me and playing pretend.  It had to be right.

I remember attending a boy’s birthday party, where, in the backyard, some of the kids were playing pretend.  There was  Superman, “Kato” ( the sidekick to TV’s “Green Hornet,” portrayed on the show by a young unknown martial artist named Bruce Lee), the Fantastic Four’s Human Torch, somebody pretending to be Greg Morris’ character  on “Mission Impossible”  and  60s’ TV private eye, “Mannix.”

I  found it all disgusting:  Not in a million years would Mannix have  ever been acquainted  with the Human Torch.  Ever.

I’d bully  Tonymy younger brother,  into joining  me and our  friend  Donnie Minnis  in pretending to be the Beatles: Would it kill you to stand here,  hold that broom  and be George Harrison?  I’d assign Donnie to be John Lennon.  I was always Paul.  We didn’t have a Ringo.  Okay, so I wasn’t always consistent in my insistence on authenticity.

Peggy Lipton - Getty - 60247150_2531490486895688_1340044906046947328_o

Peggy Lipton

After Derek jumped on being “Linc,” Melvin  immediately  said he’d be “Mod Squad”’s Cool White Boy, “Pete Cochran.”   Then they  looked at me.  Uh uh.  No way  am I going  to be the chick. I’m not a girl.

“But we just playin’,” Derek coyly pushed back.  “You know I  ain’t really Linc.  Melvin ain’t that white cat.  We just playin’.”

“Yeah,  but…I ain’t  doin’  it.”

We went back and forth about this, before Derek tossed a grenade into the mix:  “…And we was gon’ play Mod Squad all the way to Grady’s,” he said, referring to the mid-sized trailer a few blocks away that had been permanentized by a cement foundation and plumbing into an air conditioned, counter seating-only diner serving  burgers and hot dogs.  “I was going to  treat.”  Melvin’s eyes widened.  Again, he looked at me.

Shoot. I did not want to do this.  I suspected  Derek simply wanted me to be Julie Barnes in the name of humiliation.

chilli-dog

But the stakes were high.  A  Grady’s hot dog, smothered in chili and onions,  accessorized  by a  bag  of Lay’s potato chips, all of it washed down with an ice cold  grape  Nehi pop, was no joke.

So I relented to being Julie Barnes.  But I had rules. For one, they  couldn’t call me Julie Barnes.  No yelling out,  “Let’s get outta here, Julie!” or “Duck, Julie, it’s a bomb!” None of that.  Melvin’s  mother agreed that he could go to Grady’s.  However,  coolness had its limits: she gave him some change and instructed him to at some point Mod Squad himself into Safeway and  return with a bottle of Clorox.

 Playing Mod Squad involved what playing pretend usually entailed: a lot of stylized running, peeking around the corners of trees, cars, buildings, and socking it out with imaginary crooks.

As Julie,  I merely walked with the guys.  Thanks  to God’s divine mercy, on TV Julie Barnes never sashayed  or  was purposefully “sexy.” Indeed,  Lipton’s character, which appeared perpetually contemplative and  seldom smiled, was the first woman in a man’s world that I remember watching on TV who didn’t exist simply for the pleasure of men.  She was a human being.  Quiet, introspective.

We fought crime all the way to Safeway ’s massive parking lot,  where we ran into  Joseph  Weeks.  Fifteen,  JW, as we called him, seemed even older, his maturity the result of stunning circumstances.

When his mother passed away suddenly,  with no father in the house and apparently no extended family to speak  of, JW and his two siblings–Pam and Jonathan, thirteen and fourteen, respectively–all working various jobs after school (where they  made good grades), simply continued living in the ramshackle  house on their own.  They raised themselves.

Jimmy Stewart - gettyimages-3169699-2048x2048

Jimmy Stewart (Getty)

Tall, lanky, handsome, smart, resourceful and dignified for a kid, JW  always reminded me of  a mashup of actor Jimmy Stewart in “It’s A Wonderful Life,” and Gregory Peck in “To Kill A Mockingbird” were the combination  Black and teenaged.  JW’s dry humor could strike like a cobra. He didn’t suffer Derek’s silly antics easily, often putting Derek in his place, even when Derek didn’t always know it was happening.

“Wha’ chall doin.’”

“Playing Mod Squad,” said Melvin.

“Oh yeah?  Who’s Linc?”

“I am,” Derek said proudly.

I’m the white boy….” Chimed Melvin.

“Just two Mod Squad?” JW asked. “Where’s the chick?” He looked at me.  I looked away.

“We’re going to Grady’s,” Derek interjected, attempting to impress  JW.  “Wanna come? I’m buyin’….”

“Naw, I just ate.”

“Where you headed,’” I asked.

JW said he was going over to Darvin Bennett’s house, who, under the guidance of his dad,  owned a monster Lionel train set, legendary in the neighborhood,  that nearly  took up  their whole  garage.  “You wanna come?”

I looked at the Mod Squad. “I’m goin’ to Grady’s,” Melvin insisted, as if to say, no train set can compete with a  hotdog smothered in chili  and onions.  And cheese.  Melvin liked grated cheddar  on his.

Derek’s covert glare at  me said, Ima tell JW you’re Julie Barnes.  Nervous,  I braced  myself  for  the  ridicule…that never came.  Derek didn’t say boo  about me being Julie.  I bailed on the Squad for JW and the train set, but not without finding new  love for Derek that day, for keeping his mouth  shut.

While taking an alley shortcut to Darvin’s, we came upon a group of kids I didn’t know.  Turns out, they were playing Justice League of America, D.C. Comics’ collective of superhero crimefighters, the comic book’s original version of which included, among others,   Superman, Batman, Aquaman and The Flash.  JW knew the kid who, as Green Lantern, seemed to be running things.

Unlike the usual pretend-play, where the enemy is imaginary, these kids were about to head over to the grounds of Woodson Elementary, where another group of kids—evil space invaders—were waiting to do battle.  At stake was dominion of the Universe.

JW’s buddy said that, were we interested, we could round out the League.  “We could use a Batman,” the kid said matter-of-factly.  “We had one, but he had to go home and cut the grass….”

“I’ll be Batman,” I perked up.

“No, I’ll be Batman,” said JW.

“Nope, I said it first.  I’m Batman.”

JW waited until his friend walked away and then turned to me.  “Now, niggarito,” he undertoned firmly, “I just rescued yo’ Black ass from being a white woman.   I’m GON’ be Batman, motherfucka.”

So JW was hip all along.  That he knew I was Julie Barnes back there  and never said anything  made him my real life hero.

Robin the Boy Wonder  wasn’t in the  original Justice League, but what’s a small discrepancy  among super friends?

Quincy Jones & Peggy Lipton (Getty)

Peggy Lipton and Quincy Jones (Getty)

Fast forward  nine years  to Los Angeles, 1977.  I’m standing in the lobby  of  the  Music Center downtown swigging  Heineken with Ed Eckstein, then running Quincy Jones Productions.  We’re awaiting the start of a concert for jazz-rock band Return To Forever, when Ecktein’s famous boss, with whom I’d become acquainted through my young career as a music journalist,  suddenly appears.  He’s not alone.

“Steve, have you met Peggy?” Quincy  asks,  just as she walks up. It’s…it’s Julie Barnes!  Only it’s not Julie Barnes,  it’s Peggy Lipton.  Casually chic in a flowing white summer dress and immediately personable,  the  actress is nothing like her old Mod Squad character.  For one thing, Lipton smiles. “Hi ya doin,’” she says, extending a small  hand that executes a firm handshake.

So  taken was I to meet Lipton that I’m sure I didn’t give proper respect to another introduction Quincy made to me right after Lipton: his runnin’ buddy standing right there, legendary composer Henry Mancini, with his wife, singer Virginia  O’Connor-Mancini.

It was all over in a matter of minutes, the surreal  encounter.  Soon, Eckstein and I were in our seats digging the ferocious musicianship of RTF’s Chick Corea, Stanley Clarke, Lenny White and Al Di Meola.  The concert climaxed with an encore  of Stevie Wonder being led onstage to join the quartet for a perfunctory rendition of  Wonder’s “Superstition,”  made exciting only by the unexpected presence of Wonder  himself.

I enjoyed it all immensely. But even before Wonder’s arrival,  in my mind,  the night’s music  had been relegated to serving as soundtrack to sentimental memories. All I could think about was childhood buddies Melvin, Derek and JW, and the fact that I’d just met Ms. Mod Squad.  After the concert Eckstein and I headed into Hollywood for Greenblatt’s deli, when what I really craved was a Grady’s hot dog with  chili.  And plenty onions.  END

Steven Ivory

Steven Ivory

Steven Ivory, veteran journalist, essayist and author, writes about popular culture for magazines, newspapers, radio, TV and the Internet. Respond to him via [email protected]

 

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The Pulse of Entertainment: Billboard Chart’s #1 Vocalist Yola Nash Releases ‘Touched by Love’ CD

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yolanash-singing-3_orig

Smooth Jazz vocalist Yola Nash releases sophomore album, ‘Touched by Love.’

*“My debut was 10 years ago, it became pretty successful reaching the Top 40’s,” said Poland born Jazz vocalist Yola Nash about her debut album “Another Girl,” which garnered a Billboard #1 single “I Wanna Be Loved By You.” Currently Nash is promoting her sophomore album “Touched By Love” (YoStar).

Yola explained that the independent label she was on wanted to do too much changing, especially with her award winning musicians. She credits two people for this album, her musical director/pianist that gave her the idea for the album, and a poet who encouraged her through the label ordeal that had her on hold for three years. She also dedicated this album to her mother Danusia who encouraged and supported her since birth to follow her dreams to success.

“Touched By Love” was produced by Yola Nash in partnership with Grammy winning Jazz pianist Edsel Gomez (Dee Dee Bridgewater) – her music director.

“The project is not regular and it’s a miracle. I had so many obstacles that most people would have given up,” Yola pointed out.

Yola is a miracle. She relocated to New York from Poland, not speaking English. She earned a Bachelors degree in Nursing and in Fine Arts, and has a Masters in Psychology. For someone coming to a country not knowing the language, Yola not only learned the language, but mastered it. She went on to become a highly successful radio talk show host on “The Yola Nash Show” at WABC Radio. It’s a celebrity driven radio show where she has interviewed such icons as Billie Joel, William Shatner, Kevin Bacon, Christ Botti and Melissa Etheridge – to name a few.

“I was interviewing Chris Botti…He said, ‘Show what you got…and let it be’,” she said about launching her vocal recording career.

“I was 5 years old,” she said when I asked when her family knew she was musically inclined. “We are born with certain qualities or tastes. No one told me to love Jazz or R&B. I had a friend who had a mandolin. She would play and I would make a microphone from a rope. I would sing to the forest. My music teacher in elementary school encouraged me. In high school a teacher trained my voice for free. He had me in vocal contests and I was winning. This made me move forward.”

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Yola Nash’s sophomore album “Touched By Love” also features Grammy winning percussionist Luisito Quintero, pianist Dr. Octavio Vazquez, guitarist Graham Keir, bassist Dave Baron, and Grammy nominated accordionist Alex Meixner. Nash wrote all the songs on the album except one, “Dance With Me” which was penned by poet Fella Cederbaum. Her vocal career includes singing for Pope John Paul II, as the first Polish-American to perform with the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra – overseen by musical director Wynton Marsalis, and at New York’s Fashion Week.

Speaking in perfect English, Yola said, “You know it’s like supper important to over come that challenge (learning English). I came to American after my Masters degree. I had no friends or connections. My mother she’s been my foundation. I knew a few words…I’m still learning English everyday!”

Yola Nash is also mentioned in the Guinness Book of World Records for a graphic designed she created for the “Anne Frank” play, as the biggest theatre poster in the world.

“It was a graphic design made on the computer,” she informed me. “I work for a company that makes original art work for plays and musicals. The Anne Frank Foundation had a competition…many competed. I was awarded (the job), it took 5 months. When I was designing it, they never told me they were going to print it so big!”

As you can see, Yola had many obstacles, but she over came all of them, making a success life here in America as a Jazz vocalist with Grammy winning musicians; a songwriter whose song debuted at #1 on a Billboard Chart; as a producer of her own album and radio show; as a radio show host, and as a graphic design artist. Her album “Touched By Love” combines, musically and vocally, Smooth Jazz with her Poland roots creating a fresh new Smooth Jazz sound and album. www.YolaNash.com

SYNDICATED COLUMN: Eunice Moseley, MS, MBA, MPhil has an estimated weekly readership of over ¼ million with The Pulse of Entertainment. She is also a Public Relations Strategist and Business Management Consultant at Freelance Associates, and is Promotions Director (at-large) for The Baltimore Times. www.ThePulseofEntertainment.com. EVENTS: “Uplifting Minds II” Entertainment Conference (ULMII), founded by Eunice in 1999, is into its 21st year. Next events are coming to Los Angeles Saturday, November 7, 2020 via Zoom Video Conferencing and to Baltimore Saturday April 17, 2021 at Security Square Mall. The ULMII event is a free conference offering an Entertainment Business Panel Q&A Session, a Talent Showcase and Talent Competition (vocal, songwriting, dance and acting) where aspiring artists have a chance to receive over $15,000 valued in prizes/product/services.  Log onto www.UpliftingMinds2.com for more information or to RSVP for Zoom Access email [email protected]

www.GoFundMe.com/Uplifting-Minds-II-Entertainment-Conference

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