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Civil Rights Attorney Areva Martin Launches Mental Health App for Underserved Communities

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Areva Martin

Areva Martin

*LOS ANGELES, CA – Recognizing the disparities within the healthcare market for black communities across the nation, esteemed civil rights attorney, author and advocate Areva Martin has launched Butterflly Health, a behavioral health app that is specifically crafted for underserved communities.

The consumer-based health app allows users to self-identify and join several community groups that fit their descriptors.  Within these groups, or “teams” as they app describes them, users can connect with others who may be experiencing similar feelings. Butterflly Health asks users to check in daily with a simple tap of an in-app button, and then creates a longitudinal assessment of the user’s mental health and happiness. The app creates a soft-entry point for people to better understand their mental health, and should their journey reveal deeper issues, allows them to easily connect with specialists that create practices which help them meet their challenges.

In an effort to combat the stigmas associated with mental health in the black communities, as well as the unique strain the black community faces in the midst of a global health pandemic and the horrific results of ongoing systemic racism, the Butterflly Health app offers access to care and attention to mental health through an easy-to-use app that’s created by and for black people.

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Butterfly Health

Having spent her career fighting for social and civil justice for minorities and underrepresented groups, the transition to tech CEO felt like a natural transition for Areva. A renowned civil rights attorney and Legal Analyst for CNN, Areva has built her career representing and serving Black Americans. After taking a closer look at the recent mental health strain that Black Americans are experiencing, Areva and her brother Rodney Bell, created an avenue for people to assess their mental health through a community-focused application that is specifically catered for the underserved.

Butterfly Health is a part of the Startup Health investment portfolio, along with over 335 digital health companies spanning 26 countries and covering a variety of focuses. The new app just recently secured early-stage capital from Nex Cubed, an investment partner specializing in tech companies.

ABOUT AREVA MARTIN:
Areva Martin is an award-winning attorney, best-selling author, legal commentator, talk show host, and television producer who has positioned herself as a critical voice for social justice and used her razor-sharp perspective to become America’s go-to advocate. Her tri-weekly talk show, The Special Report, takes an in-depth look at the nation’s trending topics around social justice, civil liberties, and the White House, while inviting noteworthy guests for commentary and one-on-one interviews.

 

 

 

 

 

 

source:
Julian Allen
[email protected]

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Doctor Dre: Former ‘Yo! MTV Raps’ Host Loses Leg to Diabetes / VIDEO

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Andre dr dre Brown1 - GettyImages-1264098642c
Andre dr dre Brown - GettyImages-1264098642c

Andre ‘Dr. Dre’ Brown

*The other “Dr. Dre,” Andre Brown, of “Yo! MTV Raps” fame, has been hit with another setback to his health.

Brown, 56, who’s been battling diabetes for years recently announced that he had a leg amputated and his family started a GoFundMe account to help with the medical costs.

Via Rolling Stone, Dre said on Memorial Day that he slipped and fell down a flight of stairs at his sister’s house. He suffered an injury to his right ankle, and later developed a life-threatening infection.

“The infection that was in my feet had started eating away at my bones,” he told the publication. “If I had waited another day, I’d have been septic, and I could’ve died.”

The bottom line is that doctors amputated his leg below the calf. He was fitted with a prosthetic and underwent physical therapy.

As was previously reported, Dre developed diabetes around a decade ago and last year he had lost his sight.

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“I’m a type 2 diabetic who’s lost his vision,” he said in an interview with ABC 7 New York. He told the TV station diabetes wasn’t the only contributing factor to his vision loss.

“I had my retinas reattached, so I didn’t really go blind just from the diabetes, but in the reattachment I have what you call scar tissue behind my eyes, so when that kind of fluctuates, my vision comes back,” he explained. “It fades out, then it comes back.”

Despite his recent health challenges, Doctor Dre remains positive about life.

“I’m very blessed and sometimes, a loss is a plus,” he told Rolling Stone. “I’m a very spiritual man. I’m a very God-fearing man. And if this is the master plan, then he’s done what he wants to do. It’s out of my control.”

Andre Brown, also known as “Dr. Dre,” became known nationally for co-hosting the groundbreaking “Yo! MTV Raps” with Ed Lover from 1988 to 1995. The show, which originally launched in 1987 with Fab 5 Freddy as host, introduced fans to their favorite artists. Dre, Long Island, NY native,  was also a co-founder of 1980s rap group Original Concept, and a DJ in New York and Los Angeles.

 

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The Ripple Effect of NFL QB Lamar Jackson Testing Positive for COVID-19 (Watch)

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Lamar Jackson of the Baltimore Ravens walks to the locker room during half time of the game against the New England Patriots at Gillette Stadium on November 15, 2020 in Foxborough, Massachusetts. (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)

*With Baltimore Ravens quarterback Lamar Jackson reportedly testing positive for COVID-19, joining the multitude of recent positive tests in their organization, the team’s game that was scheduled Thanksgiving night against the Pittsburgh Steelers was moved to Sunday afternoon at 1:15 p.m. EST.

But the consequences of their COVID situation extend beyond Baltimore.

ESPN’s NFL reporter Adam Schefter joined SportsCenter yesterday to discuss Jackson’s positive test and what it could mean for the Ravens/Steelers matchup and future NFL games.

Baltimore’s COVID collapse:

This week, the Ravens placed outside linebacker Pernell McPhee on the Reserve/COVID-19, joining running backs Mark Ingram and J.K. Dobbins and defensive tackle Brandon Williams. Defensive end Jihad Ward, defensive end Calais Campbell, offensive linemen Patrick Mekari and Matt Skura were also among Ravens players placed on the Reserve/Covid-19 list. Also, the Ravens said Wednesday the team “disciplined” a staff member for conduct surrounding the recent COVID-19 cases affecting the organization.

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Trump’s Thanksgiving Proclamation Touts Pandemic Courage – But Still Urges Americans to ‘Gather’

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Trump pardons turkey (2020) - GettyImages-1287480869-e1606383949390-1000x570

Trump pardons turkey (Getty)

*WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump proclaimed a national day of Thanksgiving for the fourth time on Wednesday, citing his nation’s courage in the face of a pandemic that continues to kill more than 11,000 Americans per week—but still urging citizens to “gather” despite his own government’s advice to the contrary.

2020 marks the 400th anniversary of the Mayflower’s journey across the Atlantic, and a year when at least one of every 25 Americans is a confirmed carrier of the deadly coronavirus contagion.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has dropped a hammer on traditional family closeness, advising Americans that the “safest choice” is to celebrate “virtually” or enjoy turkey and all the trimmings only “with the people you live with.”

Trump, who pooh-poohs masks in the West Wing and has already survived a Covid-19 infection himself, thumbed his nose at the health agency. “I encourage all Americans to gather, in homes and places of worship, to offer a prayer of thanks to God for our many blessings,” he said.

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WILMINGTON, DE – NOVEMBER 25:  President-elect Joe Biden delivers a Thanksgiving address at the Queen Theatre on November 25, 2020 in Wilmington, Delaware. As Biden waits to be approved for official national security briefings, the names of top members of his national security team were announced yesterday to the public. Calls continue for President Trump to concede the election and let the transition proceed without further delay. (Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images)

Roughly 110 miles to the northeast in Wilmington, Delaware, former Vice President Joe Biden made a different kind of declaration, announcing as he plunged ahead with a White House transition that Americans had a “patriotic duty” to slow the spread of the disease by wearing masks.

Trump said the perseverance, sacrifice and benevolent spirit of paramedics, doctors, essential workers and ordinary neighbors matched that of the 17th Century pilgrims who celebrated the first Thanksgiving with Native Americans in what is now Massachusetts.

Trump continued a longstanding tradition of presidential Thanksgiving proclamations that began in 1789 with George Washington. The first president was echoing the Continental Congress, which designated December 18, 1777 “for solemn thanksgiving and praise; that with one heart and one voice the good people may express the grateful feelings of their hearts, and consecrate themselves to the service of their divine benefactor.”

The formally written White House pronouncements often call for prayers of gratitude, but times of adversity have drawn different responses.

In October 1863, just as the tide was turning in the bloody Civil War, Abraham Lincoln asked Americans to mark victories in battle by praying for those who were suffering, and for the healing and restoration of one unified nation. Until then annual Thanksgiving holidays had largely been observed by state governments.

Franklin Delano Roosevelt expressed the nation’s “dependence upon Almighty God” nearly 80 years later, recalling the 23rd Psalm as he asked Americans to look to the heavens for strength and comfort: “The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want.”

He quoted the entire psalm.

Roosevelt in 1942 would officially designate the fourth Thursday in November as Thanksgiving Day.

 

circa 1790: George Washington (1732 – 1799 ), the 1st President of the United States of America. He was also Commander in Chief of the Continental army during the American War for Independence. Original Artwork: Engraving by C Burt (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
Portrait of American President Abraham Lincoln (1809 – 1865), the sixteenth President of the United States, dressed in a suit and bow tie, April 9, 1865. Five days after this portrait was taken President Lincoln was assassinated by John Wilkes Booth while attending a performance of ‘Our American Cousin’ at Ford’s Theater. (Photo by Alexander Gardner/Getty Images)

Herbert Hoover found a silver lining in the Great Depression, proclaiming in 1930 that Americans should be thankful for suffering “far less than other peoples from the present world difficulties.”

John F. Kennedy’s proclamation in November 1963 called for Americans to gather on Thanksgiving Day “in sanctuaries dedicated to worship and in homes blessed by family affection to express our gratitude for the glorious gifts of God; and let us earnestly and humbly pray that He will continue to guide and sustain us in the great unfinished tasks of achieving peace, justice, and understanding among all men and nations and of ending misery and suffering wherever they exist.”

Kennedy would die 18 days later, assassinated by a sniper’s bullet.

Ronald Reagan took the opportunity to swipe at federal welfare programs, which he believed enabled endless cycles of poverty. “Thanksgiving has become a day when Americans extend a helping hand to the less fortunate. Long before there was a government welfare program, this spirit of voluntary giving was ingrained in the American character,” Reagan said. “Americans have always understood that, truly, one must give in order to receive.”

Two months after the 9/11 terror attacks in 2001, George W. Bush offered gratitude to God for Americans’ unified resolve. Gratitude, he said, should lead to compassion for those who were suffering.

Trump on Wednesday subtly touted his own administration’s work on the Covid-19 pandemic, saying Americans have made “significant breakthroughs that will end this crisis, rebuilding our stockpiles, revamping our manufacturing capabilities, and developing groundbreaking therapeutics and life-saving vaccines on record-shattering timeframes.”

381257 13: The President and Mrs. Kennedy attend a White House Ceremony, November 10, 1963. (Photo by National Archive/Newsmakers)

He also recalled how the Mayflower’s passengers “endured two long months at sea, tired and hungry” and “lost nearly half of their fellow travelers to exposure, disease, and starvation” during the winter that followed.

“Despite unimaginable hardships, these first Americans remained firm in their faith and unwavering in their commitment to their dreams,” he said. “They forged friendships with the Wampanoag Tribe, fostered a spirit of common purpose among themselves, and trusted in God to provide for them.”

Today, Trump said, “[i]n the midst of suffering and loss, we are witnessing the remarkable courage and boundless generosity of the American people as they come to the aid of those in need, reflecting the spirit of those first settlers who worked together to meet the needs of their community.”

On Thursday, he said, Americans will “reaffirm our everlasting gratitude for all that we enjoy” and “commemorate the legacy of generosity bestowed upon us by our forbearers [sic].”

(Edited by David Matthew and Daniel Kucin, Jr.)



The post Trump’s Thanksgiving proclamation touts pandemic courage—but still urges Americans to ‘gather’ appeared first on Zenger News.

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