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Jason Sudeikis As ‘Ted Lasso’ Will Rope You Into Tons of Laughs! / WATCH

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Jason Sudeikis - Ted Lasso screenshot2

Jason Sudeikis – Ted Lasso screenshot2

*Jason Sudeikis plays Ted Lasso, a small-time college football coach from Kansas hired to coach a professional soccer team in England, despite having no experience coaching soccer. The series also stars Hannah Waddingham, Brendan Hunt, Jeremy Swift, Juno Temple, Brett Goldstein, Phil Dunster and Nick Mohammed.

In addition to starring, Sudeikis serves as executive producer, alongside Bill Lawrence (“Scrubs”) via his Doozer Productions, in association with Warner Bros. Television and Universal Television, a division of NBCUniversal Content. Doozer’s Jeff Ingold also serves as an executive producer with Liza Katzer as co-executive producer. The series was developed by Sudeikis, Lawrence, Joe Kelly and Brendan Hunt, and is based on the pre-existing format and characters from NBC Sports.

So, who is Ted Lasso and why is this show so heartwarming and funny?  We sat down with Jason Sudeikis and he said “Ted Lasso is a small time, Division Two, Wichita, Kansas football coach, that gets hired out of nowhere to coach a professional soccer team in London, AFC Richmond.” “He’s the main protagonist who happens to also be named after Ted Lasso.”  Jason Sudeikis made this character famous from a series of promos for NBC Sports coverage of the Premier League, years ago and he decided to make a series out of it; his first regular sketch series since his 8 years on NBC’s sketch comedy show, SNL.

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Ted Lasso is an average man trying his best to understand a crazy world, while maintaining his unwarranted charm and confidence, where a person or people have ulterior motives towards him and are trying to bring him down.  This story is a feel-good story that is a perfect addition to AppleTV+.  In these unprecedented times, Jason Sudeikis said “while the show is funny, he and Bill Lawrence wanted it to be something that could feel like it could take place on earth, at this time and space.”

Jason Sudeikis then went on to ask, in our exclusive interview with him, “How do we make that palatable to people? The big question was, ‘how could someone who has no idea what they are doing, be in charge of something as important as a professional soccer team’; and now a lot of the country is asking themselves that same question, but with something more important than a professional soccer team, but the entire country!” So, now the show ends up becoming a parable for how and what do we do when that energy is the room and how do we respond to it?

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Ted Lasso, Jason Sudeikis believes, is not overtly political, but he does believe in the power of the people! Ted Lasso believes in supporting each other, encouraging each other and looking at the world with “the glass half full”.  What you’ll enjoy about Ted Lasso, is that it’s completely relatable, it has a ton of funny moments and it is the ultimate underdog story…with a twist!

Ted Lasso oozes charm, optimism and endless positivity.  In a world of uncertainty, division, and the public awareness of the racial and social injustices of the day, a protagonist of such hope could be perceived as cloying instead of endearing, but it’s simply impossible to hate Ted Lasso, both the character and the series!  The show is a breath of fresh air and will definitely be on your binge-worthy list, even for the simple “escape into all things good” that it allows you!  If you are a tv lover, a comedy lover or even just want something new to invest your time in, this is your show!

The first three episodes of Ted Lasso are set to premiere on Apple TV+ on Friday, August 14, 2020. The remaining seven episodes of the 10-episode season will follow on a weekly basis. Watch the official trailer below and then set your streaming cue!

 

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Show ‘Em How We Do It Now! Happy 78th B’Day to Herb Fame of Peaches & Herb [EUR Video Throwback]

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201788480HERBFAMEB1
201788480HERBFAMEB1

Herb Fame of Peaches & Herb

*There were many Peaches in Peaches & Herb throughout the decades, but only one Herb. And today is his 78th birthday.

Born Herbert Feemster on Oct. 1, 1942, in the Anacostia section of Washington D.C. , Herb changed his last name to Fame and got his start in the music business after graduating from Roosevelt High School.

While working in a record store, he crossed paths with musician and record producer Van McCoy, who would go on to record the iconic disco staple “The Hustle” in 1975.

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Van McCoy ended up signing Herb to Columbia subsidiary Date Records and paired him up with Francine “Peaches” Barker, who had been part of a trio on the label called The Sweet Things under her stage name Francine Day.

From McCoy’s recordings of Fame and Barker – now called Peaches & Herb – came the single, “We’re in This Thing Together,” which was  a flop — until months later in December of 1966, when a St. Louis disc jockey played the single’s B-side, a revival of the 1934 hit “Let’s Fall in Love.”

“Let’s Fall in Love” became a hit, and was followed in the next two years by several albums and singles, including the hits “Close Your Eyes,” “Love Is Strange” and “For Your Love.”

Although their careers were taking off around their media image as the “Sweethearts of Soul,” Barker got tired of her years on the road and decided to retire from the duo. Enter singer Marlene Mack (aka Marlene Jenkins), who became the new “Peaches” on stage, while Barker’s vocals remained on all of the duo’s recordings for Date Records.

Herb ended the act in 1970 and took a hard left turn by enrolling in the D.C. police academy. He was a full time police officer until 1976, when he decided to jump back into the music business with a fresh new Peaches. His mentor McCoy suggested local D.C. talent Linda Greene, whose musical training took place at DC’s Sewell Music Conservatory. Fame met Greene and the two hit it off, becoming the most successful Peaches and Herb incarnation of the three to date.

Their first of seven albums together, “Peaches & Herb,” was produced by McCoy for MCA Records and generated the lone hit single, “We’re Still Together.”

Next, Peaches & Herb signed with MVP/Polydor and released the album “2 Hot,” which went gold. It’s first single, “Shake Your Groove Thing,” also went gold and peaked at #5 on the Billboard Hot 100 in March 1979.

The follow-up single was the triple platinum, Grammy-nominated hit “Reunited.” With a wink to the 1960s Peaches & Herb hit “United” (originally recorded and made a hit by The Intruders), “Reunited” reached No. 1 on both the Hot 100, the Billboard R&B chart, and in Canada. It was nominated for a Song of the Year Grammy in 1980.

Subsequent albums with Polydor produced several more hits, including the wedding staple, “I Pledge My Love.”

After changing labels again to the Entertainment Company, Fame and Greene released their seventh and final album in 1983. Scoring only one minor hit, the duo decided to call it quits. Fame returned to law enforcement and joined the U.S. Marshals Service in 1986 as a deputized court security officer at the U.S. Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims.

Herb Fame recruited at least five more Peacheses in subsequent years, including the first non-black Peaches. He continues to tour and perform with the Peaches du jour…

But he never quite matched the success of his run with Peaches #3, Linda Greene.

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‘Negative Exposure’: Film Flips the Script on Racism to Achieve Racial Reform / VIDEO

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Negative Exposure1 (poster)

*For centuries, Black people in America have been subjected to systemic racism that has touched every sector of their lives.  With ongoing displacement, exclusion, bias, segregation, and socioeconomic injustices, an overwhelming population of Black people find themselves woefully and wrongfully denied fair housing, a quality education, bountiful employment, affordable health care, and a fair justice system.  For White people, it’s the opposite.

Yet, what if the tables were turned, which presented a reversal of Black and White roles in America?  Imagine if Black people were the privileged sector of society and benefactors of golden opportunities in  their lives.  Suppose White people were transmuted to assume subservient roles that many Black people have struggled to shake since slavery.

In the recently released film, “Negative Exposure,” such reversals of Black and White roles come to fruition.  The movie’s storyline follows Jayson Gresham (Taylor Katsanis), a young WHITE MAN trapped in the ghetto, where vicious cycles of poverty, hopelessness, racial profiling and police harassment have  been a daily way of life for generations.  Jayson’s longtime friend is Bones (Darrell Snedeger), a White hoodlum who controls everything that’s illegal in the hood, specifically the sale of drugs and gang activities.

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Bishop Eric Warren Davis

Bishop Eric Warren Davis

Nevertheless, Jayson seeks a better life for his young daughter and himself.  However, Blacks maintain a system of racism to keep Jayson and other ghetto-dwelling Whites suppressed.  As a result, Jayson, through interactions with Bones, faces decisions and consequences that will alter his life in definitive ways.

The film was shot in Columbia, South Carolina – although it could have been shot in any American city, where impoverished communities and underserved populations fight for survival.

“The film’s concept has been brimming in me for about eight years,” said Bishop Eric Warren Davis, who is the film’s executive producer and stars as Pastor Kingsley, an elite Black clergy with ruling class  privileges, who is ultimately faced with soul-searching decisions in the name of humanity.  “After the Trayvon Martin deadly shooting,  I found myself having discussions with interracial groups and saw the lack of empathy, even in rooms with multicultural pastors.  That’s when the concept came to me to make a movie where there is a reversal of roles.  I saw the film as a way to deliver a powerful message about racism.”

According to Davis, he created E.D. Legacy Films in Columbia, South Carolina.  Last year, Davis and his film company partnered with writer/director/producer Tony Tite of Atlanta-based Global Star Media TV/Films.  Tite wrote the movie script and served as the film’s director.  The two men assembled a production crew out of Atlanta and an integrated cast of actors and actresses from Georgia, South Carolina and North Carolina.  The movie, said Davis, was shot in 21 days, wrapping up production in early March of 2020, just days before the COVID-19 pandemic hit the nation.

Negative Exposure (white guy)

While the COVID-19 pandemic has prevented the film from being shown in movie theaters, at the moment, “Negative Exposure” can be seen on Vimeo, an on-demand film/video hosting, sharing, and services platform.  On Vimeo, the movie can be rented or purchased. However, Davis said talks are still on-going with national and international movie theaters to show the film.

“The feedback from the film has been very positive,” said Davis. “We expected some pushback because people are going to have their biases.  Most people thought because the film was directed by a Black person that it was going to have an angry message.  This movie has black and white points in it that had to be made but the ultimate message is loving one another and having empathy for one another.  But there were some hard points made in the movie to get to those messages.”

Negative Exposure - Jayson pulled over

Davis believes “Negative Exposure” is right for this moment in time, although racism has been around for centuries.  And there are countless news stories of police brutality and other injustices against Black people at a rate too frequent to count.  However, the tragic murders of Tamir Rice, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and George Floyd represent only a few Black lives that have been lost to the rages of racial and inhumane hatred.  What has followed these fatal encounters have been mass protests, coast to coast.

“The reasons why there are so many protests across the country and the world is that people are tired of systems based on stereotypical perceptions that are not in step with a changing world and generations,” said Davis. “The world is crying out for ‘justice and change.’  It’s no longer classism or racism as usual, there has to be a clearer picture, and in ‘Negative Exposure’ we offer the opportunity to look at where we need to be moving as a society.”

Negative Exposure (poster)

Based on the film’s potent message, the movie has garnered the attention of The National Black Caucus of State Legislators (NBCSL).  With its 700 members, the organization represents more than 50 million Americans across the country.  NBCSL has adopted the J.A.Y.S.O.N. (Just as Your Son) Resolution, which is based on a concept from the movie.  During the upcoming NBCSL 44th Virtual Annual Legislative Conference in late November into December, the group will screen the movie as part of a central discussion.  The organization is targeting more than 100,000 young people to watch the film.

“Negative Exposure” is seen as a call to action in an effort to expedite legislation to transform policing into a model that is equitable and safe for all communities, specifically those inhabited by people of color,” said Davis.  “We want to take audiences out of the dark into the light and joining forces with NBCSL to strengthen political advocacy in local communities is one way to accomplish this goal.  This film stands as a beacon for social and racial reform!”

To learn more about “Negative Exposure” log on to www.negativeexposuremovie.com.  To see the film on Vimeo, log on to https://vimeo.com/ondemand/negativeexposure.

 

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Family Members’ Domestic Violence Murders ‘MOVE’ a Mother to Act-The Story on ID’s ‘Impact of Murder’ Thursday (10/1) (EUR EXCLUSIVE!)

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Corrinna Martin-download (3)

eur impact of murder

OCTOBER IS DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AWARENESS MONTH 

*Each year, the month of October brings Domestic Violence Awareness to the forefront. The finale of Investigation Discovery’s (ID) “Impact of Murder” kicks off this important month by profiling Corrinna Martin, who lost two daughters and a granddaughter to domestic violence. The episode called “There’s No Winning in Murder,” premieres Thursday, October 1 at 9 p.m. ET/PT.

In a phone interview with the EUR, Martin said that while she may not have been ready to tell her story on camera, she knew it was something she had to do.

“I was completely skeptical because we as black and brown women are not treated and depicted the way we should be or respected in the media the way we should be,” Martin said. “But after talking with one of the executive producers, she assured me it would be done very respectfully with sensitivity to myself, my family, and our devastation.”

She continued, “I knew I had to speak on behalf of my daughters (Alyssiah Wiley and Chaquinequea Brodie) and my granddaughter (My’Jaeaha Richardson). But (doing the show) was also to be an example to women that we have to be extremely careful (with dating and domestic violence), especially our black and brown women.”

Investigation Discovery

Corrinna Martin, mother of Chaquinequea Brodie and Alyssiah Wiley. (Photo Credit: Investigation Discovery)

Hailing from West Haven, Connecticut, Martin’s harrowing story began in early 2013 when her daughter Alyssiah, who was in college, was murdered and dismembered. After it was discovered that Alyssiah suffered from a pattern of abuse by a boyfriend, just a few short months later Martin set up the domestic violence program Mothers of Victim Equality (M.O.V.E. Inc.) to help other victims.

“When Alyssiah was murdered, I vowed that she would not be another black woman forgotten,” Martin said.

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Alyssiah Wiley (Photo Credit: M.O.V.E. Inc.)

It was hard to find justice for Alyssiah’s murder because due to a lack of physical evidence against the suspect, two trials resulted in hung juries. Just weeks before the third trial, an additional tragedy struck – another of Martin’s daughter’s (Chaquinequea) and granddaughter were killed in yet a second domestic violence situation. What keeps Martin going is having faith in a higher power and the memory of her family members.

“It’s their spirit, drive, and tenacity they had for life – that’s what’s driving me,” Martin said. “It’s not going to stop.”

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Chaquinequea Brodie in green. (Photo Credit: M.O.V.E. Inc.)

Ironically, Chaquinequea was serving as the Vice President of M.O.V.E. when she was killed.

“The most dangerous time for a woman is getting out of a volatile situation,” Martin added. “I had to continue on. I don’t want another mother to go through this. There’s more that we can do instead of waiting until after the fact – promote proactivity, engage not just those that are around you but the community as a whole. Empower those that are in situations that feel like they can’t get out or want to get out but don’t have the means of getting out.”

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My’Jaeaha Richardson (Photo Credit: M.O.V.E. Inc.)

If the pain of a second daughter and granddaughter being killed was not enough, Martin, the mother of four daughters altogether, said the legal system also failed them a second time.

“(Chaquinequea) knew about doing searches and background checks,” Martin said. “But I had to pivot in my plight and in our mission (at M.O.V.E.) to bring awareness, reeducation and to empower, encourage and engage. (I had) to propose a National Violent Offenders Registry petition because the person she was dating had multiple offenses but they weren’t in the state that he lived in.”

Martin added that current offender registries are very limiting, which is why she hopes her proposal works.

“It wasn’t until afterwards that I found out (the suspect) did have a few charges but because they weren’t public knowledge (the information could not be found easily). I’m proposing a registry that’s free of charge so that it will be an excellent tool to safeguard our women, children, and communities from perpetrators who go from victim to victim.”

She continued, “There are so many specifics you have to know (middle name/place of birth) that it’s very frustrating. The more information you need, the more you have to pay. It’s like why do we have to pay for our safety? We have a right to protect ourselves and if we want our government to provide this most essential information then we need to do something in order to make them see and that’s why I created (the) petition on change.org. (Read about it and find it here).

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Chaquinequea Brodie (left), My’Jaeaha Richardson (top right). and Alyssiah Wiley (bottom right). (Photo Credit: M.O.V.E. Inc.)

The death of Martin’s family members causes pause because they are all African American females. Statistics show that black and brown women are affected by domestic violence more than their white counterparts. According to the Blackburn Center, black women are 2.5x more likely to be murdered than white women.

“The numbers are more overwhelming when you understand that it’s happening from black men to black women,” Martin said. “It’s highly important that the takeaway from our documentary is to be aware that because of the subtleties you may think that you are not in that kind of a situation. It’s not just physical abuse, it’s emotional, financial, and sexual.”

Martin continued, “They were very subtle for my girls. You don’t look for intimidation and being controlling as part of domestic violence. It falls under emotional, psychological, and physiological because when you’re beaten down physically and emotionally it takes a toll on your body. We get so disrespected and have this reputation as being the ‘angry black woman,’ (people) do not really understand the struggles we go through just to maintain our sanity throughout the day.”

Martin added that one factor that black women may be affected more by domestic violence is fear that her significant other may be another black man in the penal system.

“Yes, it plays a lot on not putting them in the system. I talk about not carrying your perpetrators guilt. And that’s what we do a lot of times. We want to be mothering and understanding of our mate’s plight but at the same time we’re the ones getting beat down.”

ID’s “Impact of Murder” – “There’s No Winning in Murder” airs on Thursday, October 1 at 9 p.m. ET/PT.

For more information on Corrinna Martin’s M.O.V.E. Inc. organization, go here.

If you or a family member is a victim of domestic violence and/or sexual abuse, find agencies in your state/country by going to HotPeach Pages and get the help you need.

 

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