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Clark Atlanta Partners with ‘T.I.’ & Dr. Melva K. Williams to Bring Trap Music to the University

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TI & Melva Williams

*ATLANTA, GA – Clark Atlanta University (CAU) President George T. French Jr. is thinking outside the box when it comes to educating, enlightening and empowering CAU students.

The university is partnering with three-time Grammy Award-winning recording artist, actor, producer, songwriter and entrepreneur Tip “T.I.” Harris to create an amazing experience for CAU undergraduate students this Fall.

“HBCUs have a vital role in our community and have managed to withstand even while being some of the most under-resourced institutions,” said T.I.  “Our national HBCUs continue to underscore the fact that we have always had to do more with less. I am excited to be partnering with Clark Atlanta University in my hometown – Atlanta.”

“I applaud their innovative approach to ensuring their students are educated beyond the traditional textbook curriculum. I am honored to lend my voice and unique experiences to the betterment of today’s young people and to do my part to lift the legacy of historically black colleges and universities across the nation,” T.I. said.

RELATED: Former NBA Player Launches Free Basketball, STEM, Music and Dance Clinics for Atlanta Area Students

Clark Atlanta Univ - youtube - maxresdefault

Clark Atlanta University (YouTube screenshot)

T.I. will be tag-teaming with Presidential Leadership Scholar and hip-hop aficionado, Dr. Melva K. Williams on the “Business of Trap Music.”  Williams brought forward the concept as a way to expose the life, career, entrepreneurial success, experiences, and the like of national recording artist, T.I., to the HBCU community.  Williams is a prominent figure in higher education and is a long-time educator, HBCU advocate, and co-founder for the Higher Education Leadership Foundation (H.E.L.F.).  She also serves as a Vice Chancellor for Southern University Shreveport and New Orleans.

“In higher education, it is important that we challenge, empower and equip our students with the proper resources to excel,” said President George T. French Jr.  “I believe the best way to do this is to understand their culture and create life-long experiences that will not only motivate our scholars but present them with opportunities to help them become globally competitive,” French said.

Trap Music is a sub-genre of hip-hop music and is a cultural phenomenon that involves a variety of art forms. The genre has been embraced worldwide, has been infused with other types of music and has become a part of everyday living.  The effect of Trap Music is well known, but the business of Trap Music and its ability to enlighten and educate will be explored on the campus of Clark Atlanta University.
 

 

 

 

source:
Chris Chambers
[email protected]

Shannon Atran
[email protected]

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Education

Black Doctor (Shawn Smith) Launches Diabetes Meal Plan For African Americans

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Shawn Smith
Shawn Smith

Shawn Smith

Austin, TX — Dr. Shawn Smith, CEO and founder of the My Black Diabetes Meal Plan, has released the first-ever core product for reversing diabetes in African American pre-diabetics & Type 2 patients. It is called The 28 Day Plan. Designed to address the systemic challenges Black Americans face when dealing with diabetes, the program makes eating well a habit, not a chore.

The 28 Day Plan has taken the team over 560 hours of nutritional investigation to acquire and build. The core plan comes with easy to use software built around Black ‘soul food’ culture, detailed recipe and grocery lists, and a baseline of food combinations that have been used to take user A1cs (the three-month snapshot of blood sugar levels) from a 12 (high and unhealthy) to 5.2 (normal range).

Each plan is supported with a unique alkaline approach and backed by decades of peer-reviewed nutrition science shown to be the most impactful on blood glucose levels in long-term participants. With a growing community of Black diabetics also available through the platform, Black people facing diabetes learn quickly that they have a community of supporters who are going through the same experiences and are eager to grow together.

“We’re out to initiate a new type of Black activism & empowerment, one where serving our community in powerful ways is completely normal,” says Dr. Smith. “Since we know Black diabetics are 50% more likely to go blind from the disease and 2.5 times more likely to die from diabetic complications than their White counterparts, I believe one of the best forms of protest is to live life without the fear of death or the stress of a failing body. Unfortunately, you can’t do that if you’re A1cs are too high.

RELATED NEWS: State Offers New Rape, Assault Protections for Health Care Workers

Removing Type 2 diabetes and its complications from the Black community is one way we’re giving our people their freedom back… and it’s only the beginning.”

“I’m so glad you are [My Black Diabetes Meal Plan] getting involved in this fight,” said Dr. Antonio Smith (no relation to founder) of Internal Medicine Physician at Harper University Hospital- Detroit Medical Center. “Lifestyle change is one of the most overlooked ways diabetic patients are able to permanently get off medication that I’ve seen. We needed something like this.”

The 28 Day Plan is customized and personalized for each user. The free diabetic assessment and plan are now available for use directly online at MyBlackDiabetesMealPlan.com.

The purpose of My Black Diabetes Meal Plan is to eradicate Type 2 diabetes in the Black community. With painstaking research, collaborations with internal medicine physicians, and chronically high HbA1cs.

For press inquiries, contact Shawn Smith at [email protected] or 512-456-8017.

 

 

 

 

 

 

source:
Shawn Smith
[email protected]

 

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Education

Indiana High School Apologizes After Student is Listed in Yearbook Photo as ‘Black Guy’

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*The superintendent of an Indiana high school issued a video apology this week after a photo caption in the school’s 2020 yearbook listed an African American student on the boys’ basketball team as “BLACK GUY” instead of by his name.

The image from the Brown County High School yearbook went viral on social media, prompting the video message from school district Superintendent Laura Hammack on Tuesday.

“It has been brought to our attention that that yearbook has a truly incomprehensible statement included in it,” she said. “We are currently trying to better understand what that situation is all about.”

Officials launched an investigation after being made aware of the situation, and Hammack said the school district has promised the student and his family that “this awful situation” will be addressed.

“This is a clear violation of our nondiscrimination policy,” she said.

Hammack said it was unclear exactly how the caption made it through a series of revisions with the yearbook. In a joint statement released earlier Monday with high school Principal Matthew Stark, administrators acknowledged that the yearbook is put together by a group of students in the “only class at this school where all assignments and homework are published for all to see.”

To rectify the situation, Hammack said the school district is planning on republishing new yearbooks and having the school district foot the expense.

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#BlackLivesMatter

Some Texas Longhorn Band Members Refuse to Play Alma Mater Song over Minstrel Ties (Watch)

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Texas Longhorn Alumni Band

*The University of Texas Longhorn Band will not play their traditional alma mater song “The Eyes of Texas” at Saturday’s football game against Baylor University after a survey of members revealed several students aren’t willing to play it.

The song has divided the university community in recent months over its ties to minstrel shows where performers wore blackface. According to ABC13, the Daily Texan reported that a message sent to band members by leader Scott Hanna said the survey results wouldn’t affect whether the band performs at future games. The band has yet to play at a football game this season, due to safety restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic.t

Band members are “evenly divided” over playing the song, the student newspaper reported, but responses from certain instrument sections would prevent the band from playing this week. The message from Hanna said many band members wanted to have further discussions about the song, which he said he would facilitate.

Student athletes asked UT-Austin to drop the school song during this summer’s Black Lives Matter protests, among other demands, threatening to forgo participation in recruiting and donor events. The university responded with plans to boost Black student enrollment and recruitment, but it kept the song and pledged to educate visitors and students on its history and context.

Below is a brief rundown of the song’s racist past.

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