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NBC News Podcast: ‘Into America: Into Dirty Air’ with Trymaine Lee – LISTEN

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Trymaine Lee (getty)

*Black Americans are dying from COVID-19 at a disproportionally high rate. One of the reasons why is proximity to pollution.

In St. James Parish, Louisiana residents have been fighting for decades to stop industry-related pollution that causes a high prevalence of cancer, hypertension and other diseases.

Those health disparities are now making residents a target for COVID-19. St. James and neighboring St. John the Baptist Parishes are among the 20 U.S. counties with the highest per-capita death rate from Coronavirus.

Trymaine Lee (getty)

Trymaine Lee

Host Trymaine Lee interviews Sharon Lavigne, a community leader and lifelong resident of St. James, who is fighting for clean air. And Dr. Robert Bullard, Distinguished Professor of Urban Planning and Environmental Policy at Texas Southern University, explains the link between race, health and the environment.

INTO AMERICA elevates the voices of citizens and captures the impact of the pressing issues of our time. Listen here or wherever you get your podcasts.

 

 

 

 

source:
Bender, Cecelia
NBCUniversal
[email protected]

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Coronavirus

The Ripple Effect of NFL QB Lamar Jackson Testing Positive for COVID-19 (Watch)

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Lamar Jackson of the Baltimore Ravens walks to the locker room during half time of the game against the New England Patriots at Gillette Stadium on November 15, 2020 in Foxborough, Massachusetts. (Photo by Maddie Meyer/Getty Images)

*With Baltimore Ravens quarterback Lamar Jackson reportedly testing positive for COVID-19, joining the multitude of recent positive tests in their organization, the team’s game that was scheduled Thanksgiving night against the Pittsburgh Steelers was moved to Sunday afternoon at 1:15 p.m. EST.

But the consequences of their COVID situation extend beyond Baltimore.

ESPN’s NFL reporter Adam Schefter joined SportsCenter yesterday to discuss Jackson’s positive test and what it could mean for the Ravens/Steelers matchup and future NFL games.

Baltimore’s COVID collapse:

This week, the Ravens placed outside linebacker Pernell McPhee on the Reserve/COVID-19, joining running backs Mark Ingram and J.K. Dobbins and defensive tackle Brandon Williams. Defensive end Jihad Ward, defensive end Calais Campbell, offensive linemen Patrick Mekari and Matt Skura were also among Ravens players placed on the Reserve/Covid-19 list. Also, the Ravens said Wednesday the team “disciplined” a staff member for conduct surrounding the recent COVID-19 cases affecting the organization.

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Trump’s Thanksgiving Proclamation Touts Pandemic Courage – But Still Urges Americans to ‘Gather’

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Trump pardons turkey (2020) - GettyImages-1287480869-e1606383949390-1000x570

Trump pardons turkey (Getty)

*WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump proclaimed a national day of Thanksgiving for the fourth time on Wednesday, citing his nation’s courage in the face of a pandemic that continues to kill more than 11,000 Americans per week—but still urging citizens to “gather” despite his own government’s advice to the contrary.

2020 marks the 400th anniversary of the Mayflower’s journey across the Atlantic, and a year when at least one of every 25 Americans is a confirmed carrier of the deadly coronavirus contagion.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has dropped a hammer on traditional family closeness, advising Americans that the “safest choice” is to celebrate “virtually” or enjoy turkey and all the trimmings only “with the people you live with.”

Trump, who pooh-poohs masks in the West Wing and has already survived a Covid-19 infection himself, thumbed his nose at the health agency. “I encourage all Americans to gather, in homes and places of worship, to offer a prayer of thanks to God for our many blessings,” he said.

MORE NEWS: Burt’s Bees Issues Apology for Advert That Features Black Family Without Father / LOOK

WILMINGTON, DE – NOVEMBER 25:  President-elect Joe Biden delivers a Thanksgiving address at the Queen Theatre on November 25, 2020 in Wilmington, Delaware. As Biden waits to be approved for official national security briefings, the names of top members of his national security team were announced yesterday to the public. Calls continue for President Trump to concede the election and let the transition proceed without further delay. (Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images)

Roughly 110 miles to the northeast in Wilmington, Delaware, former Vice President Joe Biden made a different kind of declaration, announcing as he plunged ahead with a White House transition that Americans had a “patriotic duty” to slow the spread of the disease by wearing masks.

Trump said the perseverance, sacrifice and benevolent spirit of paramedics, doctors, essential workers and ordinary neighbors matched that of the 17th Century pilgrims who celebrated the first Thanksgiving with Native Americans in what is now Massachusetts.

Trump continued a longstanding tradition of presidential Thanksgiving proclamations that began in 1789 with George Washington. The first president was echoing the Continental Congress, which designated December 18, 1777 “for solemn thanksgiving and praise; that with one heart and one voice the good people may express the grateful feelings of their hearts, and consecrate themselves to the service of their divine benefactor.”

The formally written White House pronouncements often call for prayers of gratitude, but times of adversity have drawn different responses.

In October 1863, just as the tide was turning in the bloody Civil War, Abraham Lincoln asked Americans to mark victories in battle by praying for those who were suffering, and for the healing and restoration of one unified nation. Until then annual Thanksgiving holidays had largely been observed by state governments.

Franklin Delano Roosevelt expressed the nation’s “dependence upon Almighty God” nearly 80 years later, recalling the 23rd Psalm as he asked Americans to look to the heavens for strength and comfort: “The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want.”

He quoted the entire psalm.

Roosevelt in 1942 would officially designate the fourth Thursday in November as Thanksgiving Day.

 

circa 1790: George Washington (1732 – 1799 ), the 1st President of the United States of America. He was also Commander in Chief of the Continental army during the American War for Independence. Original Artwork: Engraving by C Burt (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
Portrait of American President Abraham Lincoln (1809 – 1865), the sixteenth President of the United States, dressed in a suit and bow tie, April 9, 1865. Five days after this portrait was taken President Lincoln was assassinated by John Wilkes Booth while attending a performance of ‘Our American Cousin’ at Ford’s Theater. (Photo by Alexander Gardner/Getty Images)

Herbert Hoover found a silver lining in the Great Depression, proclaiming in 1930 that Americans should be thankful for suffering “far less than other peoples from the present world difficulties.”

John F. Kennedy’s proclamation in November 1963 called for Americans to gather on Thanksgiving Day “in sanctuaries dedicated to worship and in homes blessed by family affection to express our gratitude for the glorious gifts of God; and let us earnestly and humbly pray that He will continue to guide and sustain us in the great unfinished tasks of achieving peace, justice, and understanding among all men and nations and of ending misery and suffering wherever they exist.”

Kennedy would die 18 days later, assassinated by a sniper’s bullet.

Ronald Reagan took the opportunity to swipe at federal welfare programs, which he believed enabled endless cycles of poverty. “Thanksgiving has become a day when Americans extend a helping hand to the less fortunate. Long before there was a government welfare program, this spirit of voluntary giving was ingrained in the American character,” Reagan said. “Americans have always understood that, truly, one must give in order to receive.”

Two months after the 9/11 terror attacks in 2001, George W. Bush offered gratitude to God for Americans’ unified resolve. Gratitude, he said, should lead to compassion for those who were suffering.

Trump on Wednesday subtly touted his own administration’s work on the Covid-19 pandemic, saying Americans have made “significant breakthroughs that will end this crisis, rebuilding our stockpiles, revamping our manufacturing capabilities, and developing groundbreaking therapeutics and life-saving vaccines on record-shattering timeframes.”

381257 13: The President and Mrs. Kennedy attend a White House Ceremony, November 10, 1963. (Photo by National Archive/Newsmakers)

He also recalled how the Mayflower’s passengers “endured two long months at sea, tired and hungry” and “lost nearly half of their fellow travelers to exposure, disease, and starvation” during the winter that followed.

“Despite unimaginable hardships, these first Americans remained firm in their faith and unwavering in their commitment to their dreams,” he said. “They forged friendships with the Wampanoag Tribe, fostered a spirit of common purpose among themselves, and trusted in God to provide for them.”

Today, Trump said, “[i]n the midst of suffering and loss, we are witnessing the remarkable courage and boundless generosity of the American people as they come to the aid of those in need, reflecting the spirit of those first settlers who worked together to meet the needs of their community.”

On Thursday, he said, Americans will “reaffirm our everlasting gratitude for all that we enjoy” and “commemorate the legacy of generosity bestowed upon us by our forbearers [sic].”

(Edited by David Matthew and Daniel Kucin, Jr.)



The post Trump’s Thanksgiving proclamation touts pandemic courage—but still urges Americans to ‘gather’ appeared first on Zenger News.

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Coronavirus

And Now Donald Trump Jr. Tests Positive for Coronavirus

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*We could be snarky about it, but we’ll resist the temptation to do so and just report straight up that Donald Trump Jr. has tested positive for the coronavirus and is quarantining at his cabin.

So far he’s not displaying any symptoms, his spokesman said. The news was first reported by Bloomberg.

“Don tested positive at the start of the week and has been quarantining out at his cabin since the result. He’s been completely asymptomatic so far and is following all medically recommended COVID-19 guidelines,” a spokesman for Donald Trump Jr. told Dailymail.com.

As far as why he’s quarantining in a cabin, he owns one in upstate NY where he likes to fly fish in the Delaware River.

You may remember that Don Jr’s girlfriend, Kimberly Guilgoyle caught the virus back in July around the 4th, but he escaped catching the disease.

However, he is the second of the president’s children to test positive for the virus, following Barron Trump’s diagnosis last month. Barron tested positive in October when both his parents had COVID.

MORE NEWS: ‘Sasha is a Mini Michelle’: Obama Explains Why He’s Scared of his Youngest Daughter (Watch)

Donald Trump Jr & Kimberly Guilfoyle - Getty- 5fb84b1832f2170011f70773

Donald Trump Jr & Kimberly Guilfoyle – Getty

Here’s more via DailyMail:

Donald Trump Jr.’s infection comes as coronavirus cases are in the rise in the United States with more than 11.9 million people infected. More than 253,000 Americans have died from the disease.

It’s unclear where the president’s oldest son may have been infected. He was at the White House on election night where several of Trump’s staff later tested positive for COVID, including White House chief of staff Mark Meadows.

He’s the latest in a long line of people close to the president to get infected.

Also on Friday, Andrew Giuliani, the son of Trump’s personal attorney Rudy Giuliani, announced he had COVID.

 

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