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MSNBC’s Mika Clarifies Comment that Rap Caused SAE’s Racist Chant (Watch)

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*“Morning Joe” co-host Mika Brzezinski appeared on “The Cycle” Wednesday to clarify earlier comments she made when discussing Oklahoma’s SAE fraternity members expelled after they were discovered on video singing racist chants.

Viewers went in on Brzezinski for appearing to suggest that hip hop was to blame for the frat members behaving in such a manner.

Asked about that criticism, Brzezinski insisted that is not what she said–or what she meant. “In no way is anyone else to blame for what they did on that bus. (The students) are responsible and they made that choice.”

Brzezinski did say she’d like to talk about rap music–but not as an explanation for what happened in Oklahoma. “There may be a good conversation to have out there about rap music, hip hop and the n-word…but there’s no moral equivalency between any lyrics and what happened on that bus. And we said that this morning on our show.”

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4 Comments

4 Comments

  1. I said it.

    March 12, 2015 at 1:13 pm

    When did blacks start having such a huge effect on whites? We obviously have had mind control over them since the creation of rap music because every time whites get caught saying the n word, rap music is to blame.

  2. Nicky Jackson

    March 12, 2015 at 1:25 pm

    Damn Jedi mind tricks are a bitch, aren’t they? GTFOH with that BS Mika.

    Willie was the only one who half way made any sense… The Morning Joe crew are apologists for the privileged elite…

  3. t

    March 12, 2015 at 2:39 pm

    Why did not they go and invite a Rapper on their show and let him blow their mind. I bet they would shut their mouth than. Mika and crazy Joe sound crazy.

  4. Gellis

    March 13, 2015 at 6:39 am

    Mika and Joe is just as crazy as those kids and their parents. Rap Music, Hip Hop music is not to blame for your kids actions. Yes the word nigga is in majority of Rap music songs, but who cares. There is a difference in the context of how the word is used in a song versus used racially. For instance, “What up, my nigga (friend) versus hang the niggas (racist). We are not talking about elementary, middle schoolers we are talking about College students who know right from wrong. Had they been singing a song with the word in there I personally wouldn’t have a problem, because that is the word is in the song. But when you are using the word to be racist and discriminate against someone then it becomes a problem. Those kids and parents need to own up to it and keep it moving. I do not hate because you or your kids do not care for blacks or whatever race you hate. Who cares, we will always be here no matter how you feel. You cannot take anything away from us. At the end of the day, my words to racist, “Take a ticket and get at the end of the line. Get back with you next year.”

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Coronavirus

Trump’s Thanksgiving Proclamation Touts Pandemic Courage – But Still Urges Americans to ‘Gather’

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*WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump proclaimed a national day of Thanksgiving for the fourth time on Wednesday, citing his nation’s courage in the face of a pandemic that continues to kill more than 11,000 Americans per week—but still urging citizens to “gather” despite his own government’s advice to the contrary.

2020 marks the 400th anniversary of the Mayflower’s journey across the Atlantic, and a year when at least one of every 25 Americans is a confirmed carrier of the deadly coronavirus contagion.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has dropped a hammer on traditional family closeness, advising Americans that the “safest choice” is to celebrate “virtually” or enjoy turkey and all the trimmings only “with the people you live with.”

Trump, who pooh-poohs masks in the West Wing and has already survived a Covid-19 infection himself, thumbed his nose at the health agency. “I encourage all Americans to gather, in homes and places of worship, to offer a prayer of thanks to God for our many blessings,” he said.

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WILMINGTON, DE – NOVEMBER 25:  President-elect Joe Biden delivers a Thanksgiving address at the Queen Theatre on November 25, 2020 in Wilmington, Delaware. As Biden waits to be approved for official national security briefings, the names of top members of his national security team were announced yesterday to the public. Calls continue for President Trump to concede the election and let the transition proceed without further delay. (Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images)

Roughly 110 miles to the northeast in Wilmington, Delaware, former Vice President Joe Biden made a different kind of declaration, announcing as he plunged ahead with a White House transition that Americans had a “patriotic duty” to slow the spread of the disease by wearing masks.

Trump said the perseverance, sacrifice and benevolent spirit of paramedics, doctors, essential workers and ordinary neighbors matched that of the 17th Century pilgrims who celebrated the first Thanksgiving with Native Americans in what is now Massachusetts.

Trump continued a longstanding tradition of presidential Thanksgiving proclamations that began in 1789 with George Washington. The first president was echoing the Continental Congress, which designated December 18, 1777 “for solemn thanksgiving and praise; that with one heart and one voice the good people may express the grateful feelings of their hearts, and consecrate themselves to the service of their divine benefactor.”

The formally written White House pronouncements often call for prayers of gratitude, but times of adversity have drawn different responses.

In October 1863, just as the tide was turning in the bloody Civil War, Abraham Lincoln asked Americans to mark victories in battle by praying for those who were suffering, and for the healing and restoration of one unified nation. Until then annual Thanksgiving holidays had largely been observed by state governments.

Franklin Delano Roosevelt expressed the nation’s “dependence upon Almighty God” nearly 80 years later, recalling the 23rd Psalm as he asked Americans to look to the heavens for strength and comfort: “The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want.”

He quoted the entire psalm.

Roosevelt in 1942 would officially designate the fourth Thursday in November as Thanksgiving Day.

 

circa 1790: George Washington (1732 – 1799 ), the 1st President of the United States of America. He was also Commander in Chief of the Continental army during the American War for Independence. Original Artwork: Engraving by C Burt (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
Portrait of American President Abraham Lincoln (1809 – 1865), the sixteenth President of the United States, dressed in a suit and bow tie, April 9, 1865. Five days after this portrait was taken President Lincoln was assassinated by John Wilkes Booth while attending a performance of ‘Our American Cousin’ at Ford’s Theater. (Photo by Alexander Gardner/Getty Images)

Herbert Hoover found a silver lining in the Great Depression, proclaiming in 1930 that Americans should be thankful for suffering “far less than other peoples from the present world difficulties.”

John F. Kennedy’s proclamation in November 1963 called for Americans to gather on Thanksgiving Day “in sanctuaries dedicated to worship and in homes blessed by family affection to express our gratitude for the glorious gifts of God; and let us earnestly and humbly pray that He will continue to guide and sustain us in the great unfinished tasks of achieving peace, justice, and understanding among all men and nations and of ending misery and suffering wherever they exist.”

Kennedy would die 18 days later, assassinated by a sniper’s bullet.

Ronald Reagan took the opportunity to swipe at federal welfare programs, which he believed enabled endless cycles of poverty. “Thanksgiving has become a day when Americans extend a helping hand to the less fortunate. Long before there was a government welfare program, this spirit of voluntary giving was ingrained in the American character,” Reagan said. “Americans have always understood that, truly, one must give in order to receive.”

Two months after the 9/11 terror attacks in 2001, George W. Bush offered gratitude to God for Americans’ unified resolve. Gratitude, he said, should lead to compassion for those who were suffering.

Trump on Wednesday subtly touted his own administration’s work on the Covid-19 pandemic, saying Americans have made “significant breakthroughs that will end this crisis, rebuilding our stockpiles, revamping our manufacturing capabilities, and developing groundbreaking therapeutics and life-saving vaccines on record-shattering timeframes.”

381257 13: The President and Mrs. Kennedy attend a White House Ceremony, November 10, 1963. (Photo by National Archive/Newsmakers)

He also recalled how the Mayflower’s passengers “endured two long months at sea, tired and hungry” and “lost nearly half of their fellow travelers to exposure, disease, and starvation” during the winter that followed.

“Despite unimaginable hardships, these first Americans remained firm in their faith and unwavering in their commitment to their dreams,” he said. “They forged friendships with the Wampanoag Tribe, fostered a spirit of common purpose among themselves, and trusted in God to provide for them.”

Today, Trump said, “[i]n the midst of suffering and loss, we are witnessing the remarkable courage and boundless generosity of the American people as they come to the aid of those in need, reflecting the spirit of those first settlers who worked together to meet the needs of their community.”

On Thursday, he said, Americans will “reaffirm our everlasting gratitude for all that we enjoy” and “commemorate the legacy of generosity bestowed upon us by our forbearers [sic].”

(Edited by David Matthew and Daniel Kucin, Jr.)



The post Trump’s Thanksgiving proclamation touts pandemic courage—but still urges Americans to ‘gather’ appeared first on Zenger News.

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‘Life After Lockup’ Exclusive Clip: Lamar Reunites with Daughter Shante [WATCH]

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*WE tv’s “Life After Lockup” returns this week with an all new epsiode that finds Lamar reuntiing with his daughter Shante reconnect.

“Growing up without my dad was really hard for me,” says Shante in the clip. “I only had one little picture to show me what my dad looks like. I missed out on a lot. I didn’t know who I was.”

Will old feelings come up when father and daughter reconnect or can they move forward?

Check out their emotional moment via our exclusive clip above.

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Elsewhere in the episode, Lindsey hatches a plan. Shawn’s M.I.A. fiancée might be pregnant. Lamar’s secret meeting puts his relationship in jeopardy. Tennison storms off and Andrea loses it.  Michael risks all with a sexy date, and Shavel’s family pressures her to cut off Quaylon. 

Meanwhile, this season on “Life After Lockup,” the couples will face plenty of firsts in their new lives together – from new marriages to divorce, new homes to new children, all while living under the challenges of their parole. Possible restrictions abound: early curfews, random check-ins, drug tests, travel prohibitions, consorting with ex-cons combined with the temptations of alcohol and drugs, the stakes have never been higher. Will they stay together and stay out of prison? 

Catch “Life After Lockup” Fridays at 9/8c.

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‘I Don’t Need Practice Shots. Against You?’ Colbert Challenges Obama to a Game of ‘Wastepaper Basketball’ (Watch)

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Stephen Challenges President Barack Obama To A Game Of “Wastepaper Basketball” – The Late Show with Stephen Colbert (Nov 24, 2020)

*President Barack Obama was in full “That’s what I do”-style trash talk mode when Stephen Colbert challenged him to a game of “wastepaper basketball” during his appearance Wednesday on “The Late Show.”

Colbert waited until Part 3 of the interview to ask #44 if he wanted to play, then had the nerve to ask Obama if he needed to warm up with some practice shots.

“I Don’t Need Practice Shots. Against You?,” Obama responded. When Colbert suggested they wager on the outcome, with Obama having to mention the host in his next book if he loses, Obama asked, “Well what if I win?”

“What do you want?” Colbert asked.

Obama shrugged off the whole prospect, saying, “Nobody’s gonna read your book anyway.” He then added, “It doesn’t matter, I’m not gonna lose.”

Colbert said he would donate to Obama’s library if he loses. And with that, the game commenced.

Obama was “crushed” by Colbert, 8 to zero.

“That’s what I do!” Colbert yelled mid-thrashing.

Watch below:

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